Tag Archives: Baptism in the Holy Spirit

Arthur F. Berg: How a Powerful Revival Among Children Produced a Future Pastor and Missionary

Berg Arthur F

Arthur and Anna Berg, with daughter, Agnes, circa 1930

This Week in AG History — June 9, 1968

By Darrin J. Rodgers
Originally published on AG News, 07 June 2018

Arthur F. Berg (1896-1983), a pioneer Assemblies of God missionary and pastor, recognized the importance of taking seriously the spiritual lives of children. He learned this from his own experience. At age 14, Arthur surrendered his life to Christ and was baptized in the Holy Spirit during a Minneapolis revival sparked by visiting Pentecostal leader William Durham. Interestingly, it was primarily young people who responded to the gospel — countless children were saved, 25 were baptized in the Holy Spirit, and 30 followed the Lord in water baptism.

For the rest of his life, Berg would share his testimony about this 1911 revival, which spiritually shaped him. The Pentecostal Evangel published his story in 1968.

Berg was born in an era when children were expected to be seen and not heard, and many traditional church services offered little to inspire or attract young people. However, early Pentecostal services — featuring testimonies, lively sermons, and peppy gospel songs — were often very accessible to young people. Countless people — both young and old — surrendered their lives to Christ in early Pentecostal services, which were known for their clear presentation of the gospel, coupled with the power of the Holy Spirit.

So it was with Berg. He was raised in a Christian home, but it was not until he experienced the Holy Spirit’s permeating presence during the Pentecostal revival that Berg finally committed his life to Christ. He described the revival as “glorious,” and that “hearts were melted together in the love of God.” The presence of God was so strong in those meetings that young people who normally did not want to attend church did not want to leave the revival services.

“The convicting power and pull of the Holy Spirit was so strong, so irresistible,” Berg recalled, “that I found myself at the altar weeping and praying my way through to a definite experience of old-fashioned salvation.” He went on to experience the baptism in the Holy Spirit and, he wrote, “exuberant glory flooded my soul.”

The revival led Berg to consecrate his life to Christian ministry. He married his childhood sweetheart, Anna, who shared a similar calling. He was ordained by the Assemblies of God in 1919, they served as missionaries in Belgian Congo from 1922 to 1926, and for the next 33 years they pastored congregations in Sisseton and Sioux Falls, South Dakota. He was also instrumental in starting the World Missions Plan, a program that encouraged Assemblies of God churches to systematically give money to home and world missions.

When William Durham went to Minneapolis in 1911, he was on a mission to talk with Pentecostal pastors regarding disagreements over the doctrine of sanctification. While the impact Durham made on adults on that trip is unknown, the revival services he led left a lasting mark on several dozen young people. One of them, Arthur Berg, became a noted pioneer Assemblies of God pastor and missionary.

Read the article, “How a Boy Received the Baptism,” on pages 24-25 of the June 9, 1968, issue of the Pentecostal Evangel.

Also featured in this issue:

• “Who is My Neighbor?” by Everett Stenhouse

• “Children Need to be Nurtured,” by Jerry Stroup

And many more!

Click here to read this issue now.

Pentecostal Evangel archived editions courtesy of the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center.

Do you have Pentecostal historical materials that should be preserved? Please consider depositing these materials at the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center (FPHC). The FPHC, located in the Assemblies of God national offices, is the largest Pentecostal archive in the world. We would like to preserve and make your treasures accessible to those who write the history books.

Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center
1445 North Boonville Avenue
Springfield, Missouri 65802 USA
Phone: 417.862.1447 ext. 4400
Toll Free: 877.840.5200
Email: archives@ag.org
Website: www.iFPHC.org

 

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E. L. Newby: How the Baptism in the Holy Spirit Launched This Assemblies of God Pioneer into Ministry

Newby ELThis Week in AG History — February 5, 1967

By Glenn W. Gohr
Originally published on PE-News, 01 February 2018

Edgar Lee “E. L.” Newby (1889-1978) was an Assemblies of God pioneer in Oklahoma, Texas, and Arizona. In a 1967 Pentecostal Evangel article, he shared a testimony of how he received the baptism in the Holy Spirit.

Newby described his experience: “The baptism in the Holy Spirit, which I experienced in 1909, is still a vivid reality to me after more than 57 years.” He noted that he attended revival services held by evangelists Archie and Pearl Adams in his home town of Waurika, Oklahoma. They testified how they had received the baptism in the Holy Spirit themselves just a few weeks earlier.

“As the meetings progressed I developed an intense hunger for the Pentecostal Baptism,” declared Newby. In one of the morning services he heard the evangelist speak a few words in tongues. At the same service, Newby said, “The Spirit of the Lord came upon me also and I began to speak in tongues.”

Here is how he described this experience: “Such a holy quietness, such a flow of joy, such a deep peace possessed me that I have never been able to express it fully.” He said it was “joy unspeakable and full of glory.” His brother-in-law, J. J. Grubbs, also received the baptism in the Holy Spirit at that revival, and both were called to preach the gospel.

Looking back on his life, Newby said, “During these years of ministry I have seen the Lord work in many ways, confirming His Word with signs following.”

His baptism in the Holy Spirit and his call to ministry, both in 1909, led to a lifetime of service in ministry with his wife and four children. In the early years, Newby was an itinerant evangelist, holding meetings in various places in Oklahoma as well as Kingsland, Texas.

He was ordained by the Texas District of the Assemblies of God in 1916 and pastored churches in Electra, Bridgeport, and Wichita Falls, Texas. Then he decided to step out into evangelistic work in Bisby and Douglas, Arizona.

After a few months in Arizona, he returned to Texas and evangelized a while before returning to the church he had previously pastored at Bridgeport. Next he pastored Rosen Heights Assembly in Fort Worth, Texas, where he oversaw the building of a new brick sanctuary in 1927, which was one of four churches he built during the period of 1916-1927.

Newby served as North Texas District superintendent from 1931-1937. He worked as business manager two different times at Southwestern Assemblies of God College (now University) where he gained the reputation of being “a man of wisdom.” He also served as a general presbyter and a district presbyter. He became a recognized leader of the Assemblies of God in Texas and the Southwest.

In later years, he evangelized in Texas, Missouri, Ohio, Michigan, and many other places. Evangelism really was his first love. After 61 years of ministry in the Assemblies of God, he passed way in Fort Worth, Texas, on Jan. 13, 1978.

E. L. Newby was an important figure in Assemblies of God circles for over 60 years. His ministry, which impacted countless people, can be traced back to his baptism in the Holy Spirit in 1909.

Read E. L. Newby’s testimony of “The River Still Flows,” on page 7 of the Feb. 5, 1967, issue of the Pentecostal Evangel.

Also featured in this issue:

• “The Power of a Holy Church,” by James Stewart

• “Faith Fills the Pews,” by Jane Scott

And many more!

Click here to read this issue now.

Pentecostal Evangel archived editions courtesy of the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center.

Do you have Pentecostal historical materials that should be preserved? Please consider depositing these materials at the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center (FPHC). The FPHC, located in the Assemblies of God national offices, is the largest Pentecostal archive in the world. We would like to preserve and make your treasures accessible to those who write the history books.

Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center
1445 North Boonville Avenue
Springfield, Missouri 65802 USA
Phone: 417.862.1447 ext. 4400
Toll Free: 877.840.5200
Email: archives@ag.org
Website: www.iFPHC.org

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New Life in the Spirit: How Two Presbyterian Missionaries Became Assemblies of God Pioneers in India

CummingsThis Week in AG History — October 14, 1962

By Glenn W. Gohr
Originally published on PE-News, 12 October 2017

Robert Cummings (1892-1972) and his wife Mildred (1892-1981) originally were sent out by the United Presbyterian Church of North America as missionaries to India. Through a series of events, the couple received the baptism in the Holy Spirit while on the mission field and then became appointed missionaries with the Assemblies of God. They had a distinguished career as missionaries and Bible instructors. Fifty-five years ago, in the Oct. 14, 1962, issue of the Pentecostal Evangel, Robert Cummings wrote an article, “What God Taught Me,” describing how he came to accept the baptism in the Holy Spirit.

The son of United Presbyterian missionaries, Cummings was born and raised in Punjab, India, and attended school there. At age 15, he attended a preparatory school in the U.S. and latter attained two bachelor’s degrees and two master’s degrees. He was ordained in 1918 with the United Presbyterian Church and served a year as a chaplain in the U.S. Army.

Robert Cummings was appointed as a missionary with the United Presbyterian Church in 1920. While on the mission field, Robert and Mildred worked with various missionary agencies before becoming independent missionaries. Robert became principal of the Landour Language School in India where he rubbed shoulders with a number of Assemblies of God missionaries.

After reading the life of Charles Finney, Robert Cummings was struck by Finney’s description of his own spiritual experience, which felt like “waves and waves of liquid love.” Cummings began praying himself to be filled with the Holy Spirit. His wife was also seeking the Pentecostal blessing. During the Easter holidays of 1924, Mildred Cummings was wonderfully baptized in the Holy Spirit. Robert kept seeking and did not receive the Baptism until after he attended a prayer retreat in January 1925.

As he was walking along a canal bank in India and was praising God, he sensed God saying to him: “You really are not praising Me and praying for My glory because you are anxious for My glory, but because you want your Baptism.” Cummings realized this was true. He felt the Lord put a new prayer in his heart, “O God! Be Thou glorified at any cost to me.” Later that day he continued in prayer and praise, “O God! Be thou exalted and glorified in each of Thy children, in me. Let Thy name be vindicated and magnified at any cost to me.” This prayer brought on a time of weeping followed by an indescribable sense of the majesty and greatness of God. His heart then was filled with joy and even laughter as he felt a strong presence of God’s Spirit.

The next day as he continued praying, the Lord began to speak many things to him. Most of all, Cummings wanted to be yielded completely to God, including his tongue. He revealed, “As I yielded it to Him He spoke through me in a language which I did not know or understand.” He felt God’s power flowing through him in a life-changing way.

After being baptized in the Holy Spirit, Robert Cummings joined the Assemblies of God. During World War II, the Cummings family left India, and Robert was appointed director of missions at Central Bible Institute (now Evangel University). Receiving appointment with the Assemblies of God, he went back to India as a missionary in 1946. He served as field secretary for South Asia from 1946-1948. In this capacity, he and his wife traveled extensively throughout India and Ceylon, representing the Assemblies of God and continued in missionary work through 1961. After retiring from missionary work, he again served on the faculty of Central Bible Institute.

Looking back on his years of missionary service and the time he received the baptism in the Holy Spirit, Cummings declared, “I can testify that this experience back in India has meant to me new life, a new world, a new Saviour, a new Spirit.”

Read Robert Cummings’ testimony, “What God Taught Me,” on pages 4, 5, and 29 of the Oct. 14, 1962, issue of the Pentecostal Evangel.

Also featured in this issue:

• “A Day at Azusa Street” by Stanley M. Horton
• “God’s Thoroughbred” by Jack West
• “Revival on Guam”

And many more!

Click here to read this issue now.

Pentecostal Evangel archived editions courtesy of the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center.

Do you have Pentecostal historical materials that should be preserved? Please consider depositing these materials at the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center (FPHC). The FPHC, located in the Assemblies of God national offices, is the largest Pentecostal archive in the world. We would like to preserve and make your treasures accessible to those who write the history books.

Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center
1445 North Boonville Avenue
Springfield, Missouri 65802 USA
Phone: 417.862.1447 ext. 4400
Toll Free: 877.840.5200
Email: archives@ag.org
Website: www.iFPHC.org

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