Tag Archives: Assemblies of God Missions

Don and Virginia Corbin: Assemblies of God Missionaries to Africa

This Week in AG History —May 5, 1974

By Ruthie Edgerly Oberg
Originally published on AG News, 14 April 2022

Don and Virginia Corbin, Assemblies of God missionaries to Africa, both received a heritage of service to God from their parents and, through God’s faithfulness, raised their own children to serve the Lord while experiencing the joys and challenges of missionary living.

The Corbin family came into the Pentecostal movement though the ministry of two evangelist sisters, Zella and Lillian Green, when Don’s great-grandfather, Daniel Boone Corbin, received the infilling of the Holy Spirit, as did his son, John, in Couch, Missouri. John’s son, Cecil, was saved and filled with the Spirit in 1919. Cecil’s son, Don Corbin, was born in 1937 and committed his life to Christ at a youth camp service in the Southern Missouri District of the Assemblies of God during his high school years.

Meanwhile, Virginia Jones was experiencing the adventurous life of a pioneer missionary kid in Upper Volta (now Burkina Faso), West Africa. Her parents, Harold and Margaret Jones, met at Southern California Bible Institute (now Vanguard University) and sailed for West Africa in January of 1932. The third child in the family, Virginia, was born in 1936 and grew up speaking English and French on the savanna of Mossiland, where she developed a love for African culture and people.

Corbin later attended Central Bible Institute (CBI, later Central Bible College) in Springfield, Missouri, in the 1950s where he was admitted to Burge Hospital for an appendectomy. There he was cared for by a student nurse named Virginia, who was preparing to return to her homeland of Upper Volta. They struck up a friendship, but the relationship was stalled because Corbin showed no interest in serving in Africa.

While traveling with a CBI musical group, The Crusaders Trio, Don spent some time in the apartment of Talmage Butler, a missionary to Senegal. Butler kept the young singer up until 3 a.m. with stories of the need and open opportunities in West Africa. Before turning in for the night, the elder missionary looked at young Corbin and said, “I feel compelled of the Holy Spirit to ask you what you will do with your life, considering the great need in the world.”

Through a gradual but persistent calling, Corbin surrendered his life to gospel work in Africa. He later was able to rekindle his friendship with Virginia, who had returned to Springfield for more education after using her nursing skills in Upper Volta. This time Corbin was ready to commit his life, not only to Virginia, but also to the land that she loved.

After graduating from CBI, the Corbins took a pastorate in Covelo, California, and received ministerial credentials with the Northern California-Nevada District of the Assemblies of God. In 1964, they sailed for Senegal, a country that was particularly resistant to the Christian faith and dominated by Islam for nine centuries. They were asked to take leadership of a small church, Evangel Temple, in the capital of Dakar. It was the only evangelical church in the city of one million people. During their time there, they were able to establish the first Christian secondary school in the land and make friends with people in the Islamic government.

In 1969, they moved to Kaolack, an important market town on the bank of the Saloum River. There they started a weekly radio broadcast giving greater credibility to the Christian message. When the government wanted to establish a radio station in the interior of the country, they asked Corbin to provide programming to fill in the time gaps. Soon they were broadcasting 50 Christian radio programs a week, using African voices, African music, and African proverbs to show people that Christianity was a faith for the African people. Many tribal chieftains heard the programming and invited them to come to their village to teach more.

In the May 5, 1974, issue of the Pentecostal Evangel, Africa Field Secretary Morris Williams highlighted the Corbin family in an article titled, “The Mission House.” He told of the “huge barn of a place” that had a second floor that served as a home for Don and Virginia and their four children, Cherisse, Christine, Donald (Craig), and Cathy while the first floor was a bustling headquarters of missionary activity. Williams describes their home as “a refuge for birds, monkeys, dogs, games, toys … and a place to bring your school friends on a holiday; a place warm with love and understanding where you can roam at will and let your imagination run wild. This home is a beehive of activity, and no one has time to dwell on the shortcomings of the shell.”

In 1975, Corbin became the area director for West and Central Africa with oversight of 11 countries: Senegal, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Ghana, Burkina Faso, Ivory Coast, Togo, Benin, Nigeria, Cameroon, and Zaire. Virginia helped to organize ministry to the multitudes of Africa women, taught in the Bible schools, and personally led all four of their children to faith in Christ.

After Morris Williams retired, Corbin was the logical choice to serve as the next field director (now regional director) for Africa. The Corbins faithfully served in this position for the next 17 years, seeing the Assemblies of God churches in Africa grow exponentially. Upon retiring in 2002, they continued to teach in the African context and travel the United States raising awareness of the need for new missionaries to carry on the work of God on the African continent. All four of their children continue to serve the Lord in education, African mission work, and in caring for their parents, now in their 80s.

When Daniel Boone Corbin came into the Pentecostal movement in the early 1900s and when Harold and Margaret Jones set foot on the shores of Africa in 1932, they could not have imagined that their grandchildren and great-grandchildren would carry on the Kingdom work that God had only begun in their lives. Continue to pray for the Corbin family, that God would raise up even yet another generation of workers in the whitened harvest fields of the world.

Read the article “The Mission House,” on page 8 of the May 5, 1974 of the Pentecostal Evangel.

Also featured in this issue:

• “The Ruined Place that Became A Garden” by Ron Snider

• “Our Night of Miracles” by Medora Harvell

Click here to read this issue now.

Pentecostal Evangel archived editions courtesy of the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center.

Do you have Pentecostal historical materials that should be preserved? Please consider depositing these materials at the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center (FPHC). The FPHC, located in the Assemblies of God national offices, is the largest Pentecostal archive in the world. We would like to preserve and make your treasures accessible to those who write the history books.

Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center
1445 North Boonville Avenue
Springfield, Missouri 65802 USA
Phone: 417.862.1447 ext. 4400
Toll Free: 877.840.5200
Email: archives@ag.org
Website: www.iFPHC.org

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From Norway to Nepal: Agnes Beckdahl, Pioneer Pentecostal Missionary

This Week in AG History — April 9, 1967

By Glenn W. Gohr
Originally published on AG-News, April 7, 2022

Agnes Nikola (Thelle) Beckdahl (1876-1968) was one of the first Pentecostal evangelists to Denmark, Germany, Switzerland, and England, and for over 50 years she served as an Assemblies of God missionary in Northern India near the border of Nepal.

Beckdahl was born at Andoen, an island near Kristiansand off the coast of Norway. She made a commitment to serve God in her teen years and later renewed her dedication at age 20. At that time, she felt a strong conviction that she was called to the mission field.

In December 1906, soon after the aftershocks from the Azusa revival had reached the European continent, Beckdahl ventured to Christiania (now Oslo), the capital of Norway, to help in mission and jail service at the Christiania Bymission (City Mission), founded by T. B. Barratt. While attending Barratt’s mission and Bible school, she opened her heart to more of God. Soon she received the baptism in the Holy Spirit.

Beginning in May 1907, Agnes, and a Norwegian coworker, Dagmar Gregersen, traveled as missionary evangelists in Denmark, Germany, Switzerland, Great Britain, and several other places. Many years later she reported on these travels: “We were the first to bring the Pentecostal testimony to Germany in spring time 1907. Went through seven countries in Europe including the Eastern United States from Boston, Massachusetts and Connecticut and New York State. I think more than 2,000 were saved and filled with the Spirit on that tour. It was a wonderful revival with an outpouring of the Holy Ghost in convicting power upon the whole world during that time!”

After traveling in evangelistic work in Europe and the United States, Beckdahl attended the Missionary Institute at Nyack, New York, in preparation to go as a missionary to India. Stopping in Norway and in England first, she arrived in India on May 10, 1910. She visited Pandita Ramabai’s Mukti Mission in Poona, India. While at Poona, she met a Salvation Army officer from Denmark named Christian Beckdahl. They kept in touch. Agnes ended up going to the Mission House at Fyzabad, India, and Christian began missionary work near the border of Nepal with the American Pentecostal Mission. Later Agnes and two coworkers were at a mission station in Nepalganj, also on the border of Nepal. Christian and Agnes decided to get married. The marriage took place in the Scandinavian Evangelical Mission in Brooklyn, New York, on Aug. 14, 1915. Two days later, they both were ordained as missionaries with the Assemblies of God at Wells Memorial Gospel Assembly in Tottenville, New York.

After some deputational work, the Beckdahls sailed for India in December 1915. They established a work in Nanpara on the border of Nepal, where Agnes had previously lived. The Beckdahls traveled throughout Northern India and in Nepal, evangelizing everywhere they went. They served as missionaries together in India for over 50 years until Christian’s death in November 1950. They raised one son, Samuel Beckdahl, who also served as an AG missionary in India and who married Ruth Merian, daughter of AG missionaries Fred and Lillian Merian.

After her husband’s death, Agnes Beckdahl returned to the United States where she lived in retirement in Pinellas Park Home and later in Bethany Retirement Home in Lakeland, Florida. She passed away on Jan. 17, 1968, at the age of 91.

During the 1960s, the Pentecostal Evangel published a series of profiles of early Assemblies of God ministers and missionaries. One of these profiles featured Agnes Beckdahl and her missionary work at Nanpara, India.

Read Agnes Beckdahl’s article, “Along the Nepal Border,” on page 22 of the April 9, 1967, issue of the Pentecostal Evangel.

Also featured in this issue:

• “The Old Farmer” by Bruce S. Williams

• “Tend Your Garden,” by Joyce Wells Booze

And many more!

Click here to read these issues now.

Pentecostal Evangel archived editions courtesy of the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center.

Do you have Pentecostal historical materials that should be preserved? Please consider depositing these materials at the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center (FPHC). The FPHC, located in the Assemblies of God national offices, is the largest Pentecostal archive in the world. We would like to preserve and make your treasures accessible to those who write the history books.

Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center
1445 North Boonville Avenue
Springfield, Missouri 65802 USA
Phone: 417.862.1447 ext. 4400
Toll Free: 877.840.5200
Email: archives@ag.org
Website: www.iFPHC.org

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Mark and Huldah Buntain: Helping the Poor of India

This Week in AG History — March 31, 1968

By Glenn W. Gohr
Originally published on AG-News, 18 March 2022

Mark Buntain (1923-1989), a longtime Assemblies of God (AG) missionary, is perhaps best known for founding a prominent hospital and feeding program in Calcutta, India. He and his wife, Huldah, became iconic symbols of the AG’s melding of gospel proclamation with works of compassion.

Buntain was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba, the son of Pentecostal minister, Daniel N. Buntain. In his youth he worked as a radio broadcaster, and then after marrying Huldah Monroe in 1944, he began pastoring churches in Saskatchewan. He also ministered as a missionary-evangelist in Taiwan, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Hong Kong, and Japan before going to India in October 1954. What started as a one-year mission assignment there turned into a lifetime of ministry. Mark, Huldah, and their 1-year-old daughter, Bonnie, took a three-month voyage across the Atlantic. After arriving in India, they set up a tent on a vacant lot in Calcutta, and started telling people about the love of Jesus.

One day a man entered the tent, interrupting the preaching, and said, “Preacher, feed our bellies and then tell us about a God in heaven.” This changed everything. It became the catalyst for the Buntains to start a feeding program, now part of Calcutta Mercy Missions, that serves thousands of people, mostly children, every day.

Mark’s ministry was featured in the Pentecostal Evangel in 1968. The article began with this statement: “Give ye them to eat.” This is exactly what the Buntains did as they carried out their much-needed ministry in North India. Not only did they provide physical food for the hungry, but they sought to meet the medical needs as well as spiritual needs of the people who crossed their paths. A testimony is given of a man named Thottathil Rajan who was suffering from hunger, was a heavy drinker, and a cripple. When New Zealand evangelist Graham Truscott preached at one of Mark’s meetings, Rajan came and was saved and healed. Soon after this, he felt called to enter Bible school in order to preach the gospel.

On another occasion, Mark went to his office, and a staff member told him, “There’s a small boy dying on the steps!” He hurried out and found a 9-year-old boy who was almost dead. Buntain brought him inside and gradually nursed him back to health. After giving him a bath, he felt even better. Soon the boy went with the other children to attend school. Surprised to discover a new student, the teacher asked him, “Who are you?” “What are you doing here?” Without hesitancy, he quickly responded, “I belong to the Sahib (meaning Mark, who was the head missionary)!”

For many years the Buntains pastored the Assembly of God in Calcutta, which grew to more than 1,500 people in Sunday School each week and 4,000 in church attendance. Mark became the assistant superintendent of the AG in North India and aired a radio broadcast three times a week to a potential audience of 145 million listeners. Following Mark’s death, Huldah became senior pastor of the church and served as chairman of the ministry.

Today, almost 70 years later, the Buntains’ hearts to reach the people groups of India still continues. The hospital continues to serve 100,000 patients each year, providing many with charitable care. The ministry also grew to over 700 churches, hundreds of schools, children’s homes, and nutritional programs in India.

Mark passed away in 1989, and Huldah continued to help oversee the ministry until her death in 2021. Calcutta Mercy Ministries continues to feed, educate, and medically assist the poor of Calcutta, India, and surrounding areas.

Read the article, “I Belong to the Sahib,” on page 15 of the March 31, 1968, issue of the Pentecostal Evangel.

Also featured in this issue:

• “Tell Me About the Council on Evangelism”

• “Betinho: King of the Night,” by Missionary T. R. Hoover

• “Why Jews Need the Gospel,” by Ernest Kalapathy

And many more!

Click here to read this issue now.

Pentecostal Evangel archived editions courtesy of the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center.

Do you have Pentecostal historical materials that should be preserved? Please consider depositing these materials at the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center (FPHC). The FPHC, located in the Assemblies of God national offices, is the largest Pentecostal archive in the world. We would like to preserve and make your treasures accessible to those who write the history books.

Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center
1445 North Boonville Avenue
Springfield, Missouri 65802 USA
Phone: 417.862.1447 ext. 4400
Toll Free: 877.840.5200
Email: archives@ag.org
Website: www.iFPHC.org

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Robert Kenneth Ware: Assemblies of God Missionary to French Jews, War Refugees, and Romani People

This Week in AG History —March 22, 1964

By Ruthie Edgerly Oberg
Originally published on AG News, 24 February 2022

Robert Kenneth Ware (1917-2005) was born in the United States and raised in Switzerland, but he devoted his ministry to persecuted Jews, displaced war refugees, and ostracized Romani people (also referred to as Gypsies) in France. Along the way he managed to learn at least five languages, establish the French Assemblies of God Bible school and Sunday School ministry, plant several churches, and provide an accurate translation of the New Testament for the French Bible Society.

Just a year after Kenneth Ware was born in Memphis, Tennessee, his father was killed in World War I. His Swiss-born mother was devastated and soon went into a deep depression. She took her young son to Switzerland where she went into seclusion to deal with her grief. Due to these early traumas, Ware developed a deep stammer that made schooling very difficult.

In 1932, English evangelist Smith Wigglesworth ministered in Vevey, Switzerland. Upon meeting young Ware on the street and seeing his predicament, he asked the boy to stick out his tongue. The evangelist touched his tongue and said, “This tongue shall preach the gospel.” From that time, his stammer ceased.

One year later, Ware surrendered his life to Christ at a revival led by Douglas Scott, a British minister who was instrumental in the formation of the French Assemblies of God. He felt a call to ministry and began to evangelize with other young people in the south of France. As a result of these efforts, at least 25 churches were planted.

Ware soon married Suzy Vinitski, a Jewish Christian. When Adolph Hitler invaded France in 1940, the Ware home became a refuge for Jews seeking to escape France into Switzerland. When a friend, under torture, revealed their names as a hiding place for Jews, the Wares attempted to flee into Switzerland. Their train was halted by Nazi agents, who ignored Suzy and their 7-month-old son, but took Kenneth for questioning. Brutally beaten and told he would be executed the next morning, he revealed to one guard that he was a pastor. This seemed upsetting to the guard who then snuck him through a darkened hallway and set him free.

Ware located his wife and son in Lausanne, Switzerland, and in 1948, they returned to France to find a devastated country flooded with refugees. Ware established a mission church for these displaced people. Remembering the care their friends and families had received before the war from the young pastors, many Jews came to his mission and later accepted Jesus as Messiah.

Because most of his money went to funding outreach, the Ware family lived in a part of Paris that was known as “the street of crimes.” Ware received permission to open a church in an abandoned night club. Within 10 years, the community was so transformed by this little church that the police no longer felt the need to patrol the streets.

In 1953, Ware was designated as a representative of the American Assemblies of God to the French Assemblies of God. He soon saw the need for greater discipleship among the French Christians. In the 1960 French General Council meetings, he requested permission to begin a Sunday School program. The response was not enthusiastic, but permission was granted.

Ware began a small printing operation in his home. While he translated Gospel Publishing House curriculum from English to French, Suzy and their two sons ran the duplicator. The operation soon became so successful that the March 22, 1964, Pentecostal Evangel reported that the Assemblies of God in the United States purchased larger printing equipment to enable the Ware family to meet the growing need for Sunday School curriculum in France.

During this time, there was a growing Pentecostal revival in the French Romani community. Once again, Ware’s heart was drawn to a people who were mistreated and thought to be of little human value. For seven years, Ware traveled to Romani camps, lived with them in trailers, established churches, and even built a Bible school and elementary school for the children. In 1972, their churches were so well established that a Romani superintendent was chosen, and Ware was able to turn his attention to other needs.

Throughout his ministry, Ware was a self-starting learner. He became an outstanding scholar of the Greek language and soon became the teacher of advanced Greek at the Continental Bible College in Brussels, Belgium. This experience motivated him to begin a Bible school for the French Assemblies of God in Paris. While at this school, the French Bible Society asked him to prepare a more accurate translation of the New Testament in French, a project that took him three years.

A stroke in 1984 curtailed the ministry of Kenneth and Suzy Ware but he continued to write and encourage the churches until his death in Courbevoie, France, in 2005. His influence continues today in French Sunday Schools, Romani communities, and every place a French-speaking person picks up a New Testament begins to read the Word of God. Smith Wigglesworth proved to be prophetic: the tongue of Kenneth Ware truly did preach the gospel.

Read Kenneth Ware’s article, “Paris Printing Plant” on page 23 of the March 22, 1964, issue of the Pentecostal Evangel.

Also featured in this issue:

• “How Cold is Too Cold?” by Donald L. Nelson

• “The Gospel for Ghana” by Robert L. Cobb

And many more!

Click here to read this issue now.

Pentecostal Evangel archived editions courtesy of the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center.

Do you have Pentecostal historical materials that should be preserved? Please consider depositing these materials at the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center (FPHC). The FPHC, located in the Assemblies of God national offices, is the largest Pentecostal archive in the world. We would like to preserve and make your treasures accessible to those who write the history books.

Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center
1445 North Boonville Avenue
Springfield, Missouri 65802 USA
Phone: 417.862.1447 ext. 4400
Toll Free: 877.840.5200
Email: archives@ag.org
Website: www.iFPHC.org

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The First African American Assemblies of God Missionaries: Isaac and Martha Neeley

Isaac and Martha Neeley passport photos, 1919

By Darrin J. Rodgers

Isaac and Martha Neeley were the first African Americans to be appointed as Assemblies of God (AG) missionaries. Isaac S. Neeley was born on August 4, 1865 near Salisbury, North Carolina.[1] Martha A. Board was born on May 3, 1866 in Princeton, Indiana.[2] They married in their late thirties on April 25, 1905, in Chicago.[3] Martha had one child who died before the age of five.[4]

The Neeleys became very active at the Stone Church, an early Pentecostal revival center in Chicago, in about 1908. They were highly regarded at the church, which was mostly white. An article in the church’s monthly magazine, the Latter Rain Evangel, called them “an indispensable adjunct of the Stone Church.”[5]

Martha felt called to missions work at a young age. Her father was connected with a colonization society that encouraged free blacks in the United States to move to Liberia. As a child she heard stories about Liberia that “stirred her heart.” After Isaac felt a call to missions at a Stone Church missions convention in about 1910, the couple began preparing themselves to serve in Liberia.[6]

L. C. Hall, a Pentecostal minister who lived in Zion City, Illinois, ordained the Neeleys as missionaries on November 30, 1913. The ordination was under the auspices of Howard A. Goss’s largely-white Pentecostal fellowship, the Church of God in Christ (which was distinct from Charles H. Mason’s group by the same name).[7]

The Neeleys set sail for Liberia, where they lived from January 25, 1914[8] until June 1, 1919.[9] They served with the Liberia Interior Mission, which consisted of American and Canadian missionaries from various denominational backgrounds, all of whom had the Pentecostal experience. A history of the mission described the organization:

“We represent Methodist, Presbyterian, Congregational, Baptist, Dunkard, Mennonite, Quakers, Pentecostal-Holiness, Mission People and Gospel Workers. So you see we are a sort of mixture, but no dispute has ever arisen in our ranks. We make the Bible the chief book, and strive to live simple and Christian lives. We baptize by immersion. All believe in the Pentecostal Experience, as received on the day of Pentecost.”[10]

The Neeleys received financial support from the Stone Church, as well as from donations mailed to the Latter Rain Evangel. The Neeleys kept their supporters informed of their missions activities through published missionary letters in the Latter Rain Evangel.[11]

The organization that ordained the Neeleys in 1913, the Church of God in Christ, dissolved when most of its leaders helped to organize the AG in April 1914. The Neeleys, however, did not transfer their ordination to the AG during their tenure in Liberia. They may have been following the example of the Stone Church, which remained independent even while becoming closely associated with the AG. The Stone Church hosted two general council meetings (November 1914 and September 1919) but did not formally affiliated with the AG until 1940.[12]

The Neeleys returned from Liberia to Chicago in the summer of 1919. Soon after their return, the Neeleys attended the September 1919 general council, which was hosted by the Stone Church. The following year, in May 1920, the Neeleys received AG credentials as evangelists from the Illinois District, endorsed by Hardy Mitchell, pastor of the Stone Church.[13]

According to an article in the Latter Rain Evangel, the Neeleys became active in ministry at the “Colored Mission on Langley Avenue.”[14] This mission was probably the Pentecostal congregation started by Lucy Smith, an black Baptist woman who was baptized in the Holy Spirit in 1914 at the Stone Church. Smith began her ministry in 1916 out of her apartment and a small flock developed, which organized in the 1930s as All Nations Pentecostal Church.[15] According to Isaac Neeley’s ministerial file, he served as an associate pastor in 1923, presumably at Smith’s mission. When the Neeleys felt called to return to Liberia later in 1923, he directed correspondence to be sent to Lucy Smith.[16]

The Neeleys received AG missionary appointment to Liberia in 1923. Isaac suffered a stroke on December 7, 1923, and died on the following day, shortly before their planned departure.[17]

An article in the Latter Rain Evangel lauded the fallen missionary:

“His funeral was one of the most blessed we have ever attended. It seemed more like a celebration of his Coronation Day than a funeral. Ministerial brethren and others from all over the city gave fitting tributes to the noble life laid down in the service of God. One of the most striking tributes to his life was given by the barber in the neighborhood as he told of Brother Neeley’s life and its effect upon all with whom he came in contact. Brother Neeley lived the life of the Lord Jesus daily; whether on the platform or doing some menial task, his heart was always filled with praises.”[18]

Martha proceeded alone in 1924 to Cape Palmas, Liberia, where she was in charge of Bethel Home, a rest home for missionaries founded in 1913. She took over the work from “Mr. and Mrs. Howard,” who had been granted furlough.[19] Her predecessors were probably Alexander and Margaret Howard, African American Pentecostals from Chicago who had been sent as missionaries to Liberia in 1920 by the United Pentecostal Council of the Assemblies of God, an African American Pentecostal group with roots in the AG. The Howards had also served at Bethel Home.[20]

The Latter Rain Evangel and the Pentecostal Evangel published a number of articles by or about Martha between 1924 and 1928. The final note in her ministerial file states she returned to America from Liberia on July 1, 1930.[21] She apparently did not renew her AG credentials. She returned to Liberia again at some point between 1930 and 1935, as passenger lists in November 1935 state that she sailed from Liberia to New York.[22] Martha A. Neeley seemingly disappeared from the historical record after 1935.

Missions has always been central to the identity of the AG. This focus on missions was probably why veteran missionaries Isaac and Martha Neeley became credentialed with the Fellowship in 1920. In 1923, when they became the first black AG missionaries, they were helping to fulfill the resolution adopted at the November 1914 general council at the Stone Church, committing the AG to achieve “the greatest evangelism the world has ever seen.”[23] People from all races and backgrounds were expected to participate in this commitment to world evangelization. May this same commitment continue to animate the Assemblies of God today!

Adapted from: Darrin J. Rodgers, “The Untold Stories of Three Black Assemblies of God Pioneers,” Assemblies of God Heritage 39/40 (2019-2020): 37-41.


[1] Isaac Neeley, U.S. Passport Application, May 15, 1919. Ancestry.com.

[2] Martha Neeley, U.S. Passport Application, March 31, 1924. Ancestry.com.

[3] Cook County, Illinois, Marriages Index. Ancestry.com.

[4] 1910 U.S. Federal Census. District 0233, Chicago Ward 03, Cook Co., Illinois, 13B.

[5] Latter Rain Evangel, November 1913, 3.

[6] Latter Rain Evangel, November 1913, 3; Martha’s father may have been influenced by Washington Graham, pastor of the African Methodist Episcopal Church in Princeton, Indiana, and a prominent supporter of missions work in Liberia. Alesia Elaine McFadden, The Artistry and Activism of Shirley Graham Du Bois: A Twentieth Century African American Torchbearer. (Ph. D. Diss, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 2009), 96, 139.

[7] Isaac and Martha Neeley, ministerial files, FPHC.

[8] Isaac Neeley, U.S. Passport Application, May 15, 1919. Ancestry.com.

[9] Martha Neeley, U.S. Passport Application, March 31, 1924. Ancestry.com.

[10] Report of the Liberia Interior Mission, 1908-1916, 3. FPHC.

[11] “First Hardships as a Missionary,” Latter Rain Evangel, April 1914, 11-12; “Wonderful Outpouring of the Spirit in West Africa,” Latter Rain Evangel, April 1914, 22-24; Isaac and Martha Neeley, “Working with Christ in West Africa and the Results,” Latter Rain Evangel, March 1917, 21-22; Martha Neeley, “Blackest Night in the Dark Continent,” Latter Rain Evangel, March 1918, 22-24; Martha Neeley, “The Native African’s Ready Response to Divine Healing,” Latter Rain Evangel, August 1919, 8-10; Isaac Neeley, “Miraculous Deliverances from Demon Possession,” Latter Rain Evangel, August 1919, 10-11.

[12] Stone Church: 100 Years, 1906-2006 (Palos Heights, IL: Stone Church, 2006), 6.

[13] Isaac and Martha Neeley, ministerial files, FPHC.

[14] Latter Rain Evangel, February 1924, 14.

[15] Glenn Gohr, “Elder Lucy Smith of Chicago,” Assemblies of God Heritage 28 (2008): 63-64.

[16] Isaac Neeley, ministerial file, FPHC.

[17] Latter Rain Evangel, February 1924, 14.

[18] Latter Rain Evangel, February 1924, 14.

[19] “Receiving Home in Liberia,” Pentecostal Evangel, December 6, 1924, 11; Christ’s Ambassadors Monthly, October 1929, 12.

[20] Ironically, in 1917 Alexander Howard had reportedly been denied AG missionary appointment on account of his race, which led the Howards to instead affiliate with the UPCAG. Alexander R. Howard, The U.P.C. Mission Work in Liberia, West Africa and Striking Incidents in Mission Work Among Heathen Tribes (New York, NY: the author, [1932?]), 4; Herman L. Greene, UPCAG – The First 90 Years: Volume 1: 1919-1945 (Sussex, NJ: GEDA, 2005), 7-11; Ogbu Kalu, African Pentecostalism: An Introduction (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008), 51-53; Scott Harrup, “A Larger Family,” Pentecostal Evangel, January 16, 2011, 8.

[21] Martha Neeley, ministerial file, FPHC.

[22] Immigration and Emigration Records. Ancestry.com.

[23] General Council Minutes, November 1914, 12.

Do you have Pentecostal historical materials that should be preserved? Please consider depositing these materials at the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center (FPHC). The FPHC, located in the Assemblies of God national offices, is the largest Pentecostal archive in the world. We would like to preserve and make your treasures accessible to those who write the history books.

Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center
1445 North Boonville Avenue
Springfield, Missouri 65802 USA
Phone: 417.862.1447 ext. 4400
Toll Free: 877.840.5200
Email: archives@ag.org
Website: www.iFPHC.org

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Jessie Wengler: Prisoner of War and Pioneer Assemblies of God Missionary to Japan

This Week in AG History —January 21, 1928

By Ruthie Edgerly Oberg
Originally published on AG News, 20 January 2022

Jessie Wengler (1887-1958), veteran Assemblies of God (AG) missionary, served for 39 years in Japan. As the only AG missionary to remain in Japan throughout World War II, she held a knowledge of the post-war needs of the nation and a respect from its people that few others could match.

Raised in Clayton, Missouri, Wengler was saved, filled with the Spirit, and called to missions in a Pentecostal meeting in 1909. During the next 10 years, she studied teacher training in Colorado and briefly studied for the ministry at Moody Bible Institute in Chicago and Brooks Bible Institute in St. Louis. She participated in jail and hospital ministry and handed out tracts in street evangelism. With no formal experience as a pastor or evangelist, the AG appointed her as a missionary to the new field of Japan in 1919. She initially went to Yokohama, where she joined Assemblies of God missionaries Barney and Mary Moore, who had arrived the year before.

After language study, the Moores sent Wengler to begin a church in Hachioji, a city of 80,000 close to Tokyo. As the only foreigner in the city, Wengler thought it best to begin reaching out to the children and formed a Sunday School in the home of a neighboring family. The children came along with parents and grandparents. The singing was especially popular, particularly the chorus, “Jesus Loves Me.” Her Bible stories and songs became so popular that the tunes could be heard in the marketplaces throughout her neighborhood. Even the Buddhist leaders took note of her success with the children and soon began teaching their own children to sing, “Buddha Loves Me.” Soon the young daughter of the family hosting Sunday School, Komiko, became Wengler’s assistant and within 10 years, the church had built a large building and Komiko was serving as pastor.

In 1928, Wengler wrote to her supporters in The Pentecostal Evangel, sharing how their new building had escaped a fire that burned down a building not four feet from their assembly. She wrote, “The little chapel stands in the burnt district a testimony to the delivering power of God.” Wengler had no idea that an even greater fire was coming that would affect her and her believing friends in a way that they could never have imagined.

The church sponsored other new church plants and Wengler felt that she could move to Toyko to help build the work there. She soon noticed a shift as the atmosphere became charged with a national patriotism that had not been as prevalent before. Pressure was mounting on Japanese churches to conform to the national image. “Thought Police” began to work to unify the thoughts, actions, and behavior of the Japanese people.

As war conditions in Asia and Europe caused concern around the world, AG missions leader Noel Perkin ordered all missionaries to return to the United States in mid-1941. Unfortunately, Wengler had been confined to a hospital bed for several months from overwork, anemia, and a heart condition. Too weak to make the trip home, Wengler was the only AG missionary to remain in Japan and was there during the bombing of Pearl Harbor in December 1941.

Partially paralyzed on her left side, the Japanese government did not place Wengler in an internment camp as they had with most Americans. She was placed under house arrest and allowed to walk to the market. Her home was searched for contraband and the land she owned was confiscated. Her Japanese friends were not allowed to visit her, although some came to bring her needed resources during the darkness of night. By the second year of the war, her rations were reduced to ¾-cup of rice and a few leaves of vegetables, which had to last for three to four days. Her weight dropped from a normal 124 pounds to less than 90 pounds. She was unable to communicate with the United States, so the AG missions department did not hear from her for four years and did not know if she was dead or alive.

Wengler faced much pressure from her neighbors to fly the Japanese flag on the monthly Rescript Day, the eighth day of each month to honor the day war was declared on the United States. She responded that as an American she could not, in good conscience, celebrate the beginning of the war nor could she recognize the emperor as god in the national celebrations. Through this time, she continued to love her neighbors and serve as a Christian example.

In 1944, American B-29s began dropping thousands of incendiary devices, focusing heavily around Tokyo. Wengler was moved by the military several times until, finally, she was housed with five Baptist missionaries interned in the city. Wengler described the March 1945 bombing: “Bombs were falling like rain all around us. Soon the whole neighborhood was a roaring inferno. No matter which way we turned to flee it seemed we were walking on fire. I cannot describe the terror. The exploding bombs, the roaring fire, the screaming people. We ran through a wall of fire to the school building where we stayed all night. In the morning we returned to find that while homes next to ours were completely destroyed, ours was still standing.”

After the war ended, Tokyo was devastated. 100,000 residents had been killed and one million were left homeless, making the March bombing the most destructive single air attack in human history. The Japanese people were dazed, confused, and exhausted. Wengler longed to serve her people but was sent back to the States in late 1945 to rest and give reports. When she returned to Japan in 1947, she served as the AG representative to the Allied powers until the final peace treaty was signed in 1951.

Wengler worked tirelessly until her death in 1958, at age 71, to help the Japanese people and to rebuild their church. She conducted Bible classes for university students and led many people to Christ who became leaders. Upon her death, she left her life insurance money to build a church in Ichikawa City and was buried with honors by her friends in Karuizawa Cemetery.

Read Wengler’s report on the Hachioji fire, “Quenched the Violence of Fire” on page 9 of the Jan. 21, 1928, issue of the Pentecostal Evangel.

Also featured in this issue:

• “The Sin of Resisting the Holy Ghost” by A.G. Jeffries

• “Are the Gifts of the Holy Spirit for Today?” by Donald Gee

And many more!

Click here to read this issue now.

Pentecostal Evangel archived editions courtesy of the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center.

Do you have Pentecostal historical materials that should be preserved? Please consider depositing these materials at the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center (FPHC). The FPHC, located in the Assemblies of God national offices, is the largest Pentecostal archive in the world. We would like to preserve and make your treasures accessible to those who write the history books.

Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center
1445 North Boonville Avenue
Springfield, Missouri 65802 USA
Phone: 417.862.1447 ext. 4400
Toll Free: 877.840.5200
Email: archives@ag.org
Website: www.iFPHC.org

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How Tears of Grief Birthed the Assemblies of God in Lakhimpur, India

This Week in AG History —October 14, 1922

By Darrin J. Rodgers
Originally published on AG-News, 14 October 2021

Herbert H. Cox (1884-1926), an early Assemblies of God missionary in India, experienced the death of a son on the mission field. A few weeks after young Alkwyn’s death, Cox wrote a letter in which he described the grief that he and his wife felt. The letter, published in the Oct. 14, 1922, issue of the Pentecostal Evangel, provides insight into the often-difficult lives of early missionaries.

Alkwyn’s death occurred at a stressful time in the Coxes’ ministry. Earlier that year, the family had moved to Lakhimpur, India, where they were trying to start an Assemblies of God mission. Things were not going well. Herbert wrote, “When we first came to this place it seemed if the whole community was against us. We could not go out without being sneered at.”

Life did not seem fair. But Cox explained that he and his wife trusted God through the difficulties. “It pleased the Lord to take from us, a few weeks ago, our youngest son,” Cox wrote. “We did not understand it, but submitted to His will in it all.” The missionaries turned their burden over to the Lord and did not allow their grief to turn into despair.

Alkwyn’s death softened the hearts of the residents of Lakhimpur. Herbert wrote, “But now the people have become so friendly and salute us wherever we are. The walls of prejudice have been broken and now we have an open door for the gospel.”

The Cox family had sown seeds of the gospel in Lakhimpur, but the gospel did not take root until the missionaries had watered those seeds with their own tears of grief.

Cox seemed to anticipate their suffering. He delivered a sermon, “The Power and Grace that Makes Martyrs,” in 1919 at the Stone Church, a large Assemblies of God congregation in Chicago. In his message, Cox described how his spiritual formation came not from a Bible school, but at the Gurney Iron Foundry in Toronto, Canada, where he had worked for 10 years before entering Nyack Missionary Training Institute.

Cox’s co-workers at the foundry led rough lives. The drugs of alcohol and tobacco went into their mouths and profanity came out. They wanted nothing to do with religion. Cox had to decide whether to take the easy route and keep his faith to himself, or to share Christ and suffer persecution. He chose the latter.

Cox testified, “He wants us to witness right where we are working these days. Of course you get your persecution. I have been knocked to the ground and held down by four men and a knife threateningly branded. I have been smitten across the mouth, but I still have the love of Jesus in my soul.”

Cox was grateful for these formative experiences of suffering. He wrote, “God made me ready in the foundry to witness [of] Jesus.” He shared his faith at the foundry, and some of his colleagues accepted Christ and their rough lives became hewn for the ministry. His first convert became a missionary and was responsible for the building of 27 churches in Nigeria.

What caused young Herbert Cox to embrace the way of suffering? He spent significant time studying the Word of God, and he took to heart the life and teachings of the Apostle Paul. Cox noted that Paul was persecuted, jailed, reviled, hungry, and thirsty. Yet this did not deter him from wanting to follow Paul’s example. In his 1919 sermon, Cox admonished listeners to be fully consecrated to Christ and His mission: “Lord, give us some Apostle Pauls today. We are in need of them. I believe God wants us to follow in the steps of this great man of God.”

Herbert Cox followed the example of the Apostle Paul and gave everything for the cause of Jesus Christ. Cox contracted smallpox while ministering in Dhaurahra, India. On Feb. 6, 1926, he joined his son, Alkwyn, in heaven.

Read the article, “Lakhimpur: A Virgin Field of One Million Souls,” by Herbert H. Cox, on page 10 of the Oct. 14, 1922, issue of the Pentecostal Evangel.

Also featured in this issue:

• “Like Precious Faith,” by Smith Wigglesworth

• “Be Filled with the Spirit,” by W. T. Gaston

And many more!

Click here to read this issue now.

Pentecostal Evangel archived editions courtesy of the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center.

Do you have Pentecostal historical materials that should be preserved? Please consider depositing these materials at the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center (FPHC). The FPHC, located in the Assemblies of God national offices, is the largest Pentecostal archive in the world. We would like to preserve and make your treasures accessible to those who write the history books.

Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center
1445 North Boonville Avenue
Springfield, Missouri 65802 USA
Phone: 417.862.1447 ext. 4400
Toll Free: 877.840.5200
Email: archives@ag.org
Website: www.iFPHC.org

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L. M. Anglin and the Rise of the Indigenous Pentecostal Church in China

This Week in AG History —September 2, 1922

By Darrin J. Rodgers
Originally published on AG-News, 02 September 2021

Christianization does not equal Westernization. The success of Pentecostals in world missions has been due, in large part, to their reliance on spiritual transformation, rather than on Western cultural education, in spreading the gospel of Jesus Christ.

The Assemblies of God committed itself in 1921 to a missions strategy of establishing self-governing, self-supporting, and self-sustaining churches in missions lands. Alice E. Luce, a Spirit-baptized Anglican missionary to India who transferred to the Assemblies of God in 1915, influenced the Assemblies of God to adopt this indigenous church principle long before it was embraced by most mainline Protestant groups. The policy was not uniformly implemented, and some Assemblies of God missionaries continued to follow the paternalistic practices of other Western churches during the early decades of the 20th century.

Leslie M. and Ava Anglin, early Assemblies of God missionaries to China, were quick to grasp the importance of establishing indigenous churches. The Anglins arrived in China in 1910 under the banner of the Baptist Gospel Mission, a small missionary sending agency. Leslie Anglin learned the Chinese language, began preaching in various villages, and assembled a small flock. By 1915, the Anglins had been baptized in the Holy Spirit, which caused the Baptist missions agency to cease its support of their ministry. They transferred to the Assemblies of God and became prominent Pentecostal pioneers in China. Over the next 20 years, the Anglins wrote over 50 letters reporting on their missions work that were published in the Pentecostal Evangel.

In 1916, the Anglins established the Home of Onesiphorus — an outreach in the city of Taian, Shantung, China, for orphans who had been abandoned by their families. As it expanded, the Home of Onesiphorus added a school for poor boys and girls, many of whom were beggars. The school provided both academic and technical training. Children were taught reading, writing, and arithmetic, as well as trades such as weaving and making furniture.

In a Sept. 2, 1922, Pentecostal Evangel article, Anglin described his approach to implementing the indigenous church principle. His goal, he wrote, was not “to create an American out of [the Chinese man],” but “to take in the outcast, clothe him, house him, and feed him in Chinese fashion.” The Home of Onesiphorus trained hundreds of lay people and Chinese Pentecostal preachers who helped lay the foundation for a strong indigenous Pentecostal church in China.

Read the article by L. M. Anglin, “The Home of Onesiphorus,” on pages 12 and 13 of the Sept. 2, 1922, issue of the Pentecostal Evangel.

Also featured in this issue:

• “How Can We Know that We Have Received the Baptism?” by Bert Williams

• “The Basis for our Distinctive Testimony,” by D. W. Kerr

And many more!

Click here to read this issue now.

Pentecostal Evangel archived editions courtesy of the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center.

Do you have Pentecostal historical materials that should be preserved? Please consider depositing these materials at the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center (FPHC). The FPHC, located in the Assemblies of God national offices, is the largest Pentecostal archive in the world. We would like to preserve and make your treasures accessible to those who write the history books.

Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center
1445 North Boonville Avenue
Springfield, Missouri 65802 USA
Phone: 417.862.1447 ext. 4400
Toll Free: 877.840.5200
Email: archives@ag.org
Website: www.iFPHC.org

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William E. Simpson: Assemblies of God Martyr and Missionary to China

Missionaries W. E. Simpson, Martha Simpson, W. W. Simpson, and Torsten Halldorf; China, circa 1925

This Week in AG History —July 23, 1932

By Darrin J. Rodgers
Originally published on AG-News, 22 July 2021

William E. Simpson (1901-1932), a young Assemblies of God missionary, was killed by bandits near the Tibetan border in China. The July 23, 1932, issue of the Pentecostal Evangel devoted several pages to the memory of Simpson, whom it hailed as “a martyr for the gospel.”

Simpson, the son of noted missionaries William W. and Otilia Simpson, spent his youth in both China and the United States. He easily learned the Chinese language and spent the last 13 years of his life living in the dangerous borderlands along Tibet. He shared the gospel with Tibetans and Chinese, with nomads, and with Buddhist priests. Simpson was able to traverse a part of the country normally inaccessible to Westerners.

In Simpson’s last letter to the Pentecostal Evangel, he recounted that Assemblies of God missionary policy stated, “The Pauline example shall be followed as far as possible by seeking out neglected regions where the gospel has not been preached.” He took this as a challenge and stated that he did not know of a “more extensive and neglected region” than the Tibetan borderlands. He lamented the small number of converts, but nevertheless pushed forward in his missionary call.

In life and death, Simpson built bridges across denominational divides. He worked extensively with Christian and Missionary Alliance missionaries and spoke at their conferences. Simpson built this bridge upon a family connection; prior to joining the Assemblies of God, Simpson’s father held credentials with the Alliance. Missionaries from both the Assemblies of God and the Christian and Missionary Alliance participated in Simpson’s funeral. Simpson, in his last letter, encouraged further cooperation between the churches: “God grant that the spirit of harmony that exists among us may grow and develop.”

Missions has always been central to the identity of the Assemblies of God. When missionaries share stories of spiritual victories and new converts, Assemblies of God members rejoice. But when young William E. Simpson died at the hands of bandits in 1932, it reminded believers that obedience to the Great Commission often has a high human cost.

Read the entire article, “A Martyr for the Gospel,” on pages 10, 11, and 14 of the July 23, 1932, issue of the Pentecostal Evangel.

Also featured in this issue:

• “High Lights in the Life of Peter,” by Dr. Charles S. Price

• “Questions Concerning Spiritual Gifts,” by Donald Gee

• “Power in the Word,” by Mrs. C. Nuzum

And many more!

Click here to read this issue now.

Pentecostal Evangel archived editions courtesy of the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center.

Do you have Pentecostal historical materials that should be preserved? Please consider depositing these materials at the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center (FPHC). The FPHC, located in the Assemblies of God national offices, is the largest Pentecostal archive in the world. We would like to preserve and make your treasures accessible to those who write the history books.

Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center
1445 North Boonville Avenue
Springfield, Missouri 65802 USA
Phone: 417.862.1447 ext. 4400
Toll Free: 877.840.5200
Email: archives@ag.org
Website: www.iFPHC.org

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Joseph and Ebba Nilsen: Pioneer Assemblies of God Missionaries in the Congo

This Week in AG History —June 30, 1974

By Ruthie Edgerly Oberg
Originally published on AG News, 01 July 2021

Joseph Walter Nilsen (1897-1974), son of Swedish immigrants to America, laid much of the foundation for the growing Assemblies of God work in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (formerly Zaire). He also was the first Assemblies of God missionary in Tanzania and established the first Assemblies of God mission station in northern Malawi. During his 30-year term as a missionary, he and his wife, Ebba, supervised day schools, evangelized villages, built churches, and opened medical clinics, while serving God and the Congolese people faithfully.

The son of Swedish Evangelical Covenant Church pastors, Nilsen served in the United States Navy during World War I and then joined the Standard Oil Company in California. He was successfully climbing the business ladder when he met a shy young lady, Ebba Arvidson, at a church meeting. His friends bet him that he could not make her talk, so he took the bet and made a date with Ebba. He asked her father for her hand in marriage and was given permission upon making the promise that he would never take her more than a day’s journey from her parents.

While on a business trip, Nilsen felt an impression that God was calling him to ministry. He quit his well-paying job and enrolled in the Assemblies of God school in San Francisco, Glad Tidings Bible Institute (later Bethany College). One evening, while in prayer after the church service, Joseph prayed that God would use him to help meet the world’s great need. As he prayed, he had a vision of a map of Africa that gradually became focused on the central region of the Belgian Congo. He saw a missionary going from village to village, building chapels. He was amazed to see that the missionary was himself.

He said nothing to Ebba about this vision. She had married a strong young man in the burgeoning oil industry who had then quit his job to go to Bible school. He also promised he would not remove her from her family. After graduation, Joseph and Ebba accepted a pastorate in Montana and had two children, but the young pastor was restless, consistently hearing in his heart that word, Congo! He prayed in desperation, “Lord, I am willing to go, but you must speak to my wife.”

Not long after, when tucking their 8-year-old daughter, Ruth, into bed after a church service, she said to her parents, “Tonight the Lord asked me if I would be a missionary to the Congo. I told him I would go if my mommy and daddy went with me.” Neither of her parents spoke. Finally, Ebba said softly, “The Lord has been asking me the same thing. I told him he would need to speak to my husband.” In 1929, with 8-year-old Ruth and infant Paul, they embarked on the 10-week journey to the Belgian Congo, conducting services each Sunday on the ship taking them to Africa.

Four days after arriving, Joseph was down with dysentery. The next week, little Paul had a serious fever. Within the first six months, all of the family experienced some form of illness including fever, measles, dysentery, and malaria. Finally, they settled on the edge of the Ituri Forest, where the sun never penetrated the thick jungle. The forest was home to wild animals, witch doctors, juju priests, and shy Pygmies. The family set about learning new languages, making friends, and building a mud home. Soon they had not only a circle of friends, but a small group of Christian believers.

In their first six-year term, the Nilsen family started a school, built churches, and established a mission station. During their second term, they opened a Bible school to train Congolese men and women to lead their own churches. More areas began to open to the gospel and the Nilsens were asked to help. Joseph took Ebba and their now three children across Central Africa and helped to establish the church in Tanzania. While in Tanzania, a chief from Malawi invited Nilsen to begin a church in his area. Later, Morris and Macey Williams came to take charge of the Malawi work and the Nilsens were able to return to the Congo.

The Assemblies of God of the Belgian Congo was formally established in 1956 and Joseph Nilsen was elected to serve as the first superintendent. However, due to the constant exhausting work and the effects of many and varied diseases, both Joseph and Ebba’s health had deteriorated over the years. By August 1959, 63-year-old Joseph knew that their health would not permit them to continue the rigorous work, and they returned to the United States leaving their work in the capable hands of Congolese workers and young missionaries whom they had trained, such as Jay and Angeline Tucker.

In 1960, political unrest caused most of the missionaries to be evacuated. However, due to the groundwork laid by Nilsen in training and commissioning Congolese converts to lead the work, every phase of the Assemblies of God ministries was able to continue under national leadership.

The Pentecostal Evangel announced the passing of pioneer missionary Joseph Nilsen in its June 30, 1974, issue, reporting that “in the face of great spiritual opposition, he established the work…” Despite the political turmoil that followed decolonization of the Congo in the 1960s, including the martyrdom of Nilsen’s young fellow missionary, J. W. Tucker, the Congolese Assemblies of God has continued to be a strong church committed to training and mobilizing workers for the harvest in Pentecostal power, largly due to the foundational work of pioneer missionaries like the Nilsen family.

Read the announcement of Nilsen’s death 28 in the June 30, 1974, issue of the Pentecostal Evangel.

Also featured in this issue:

• “The Upper Window” by Emil Balliet

• “The Churches in Eastern Europe” by T.F. Zimmerman

And many more!

Click here to read this issue now.

Pentecostal Evangel archived editions courtesy of the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center.

Do you have Pentecostal historical materials that should be preserved? Please consider depositing these materials at the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center (FPHC). The FPHC, located in the Assemblies of God national offices, is the largest Pentecostal archive in the world. We would like to preserve and make your treasures accessible to those who write the history books.

Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center
1445 North Boonville Avenue
Springfield, Missouri 65802 USA
Phone: 417.862.1447 ext. 4400
Toll Free: 877.840.5200
Email: Archives@ag.org

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