Review: The Ambassadors


The Ambassadors

The Ambassadors : A History of Two Airplanes and the Men Who Flew Them – Christ’s Ambassadors, by Bill Taylor. Seminole, FL: Sirena Press, 2005.

Few ministries in the Assemblies of God created as much visibility as two converted World War II planes that the Division of Foreign Missions operated worldwide between 1948 and 1951. Now called Assemblies of God World Missions, the ministry converted a C-46 cargo plane and made several trips to Africa, South America, India, and domestic flights — including the 1949 General Council in Seattle.

Late in 1949, the DFM, headed by Noel Perkin, traded the C-46 for a converted 4-engine B-17 bomber and operated it for the next two years. The copilot, Bill Taylor, researched and pulled together the amazing stories of a courageous crew that flew into exotic airports around the world. If you want adventure, inspiration, close calls over the oceans, and great missionary stories, The Ambassadors is for you.

Long after the Assemblies of God sold the C-46, it was destroyed in Hurricane Andrew in 1992. The B-17, Ambassador II, is now one of the main attractions of the American Museum at the Imperial War Museum, near Cambridge, England (Several websites with photos will come up through Google by inserting “Mary Alice B-17”).

Reviewed by Wayne Warner. (Reprinted from Assemblies of God Heritage, Summer-Fall 2005, p. 58)

Paperback, 238 pages, illustrated. $15.50, plus $2.50 shipping. Order from: Murmaid Publishing, 13799 Park Blvd. #162, Seminole, FL 33776. Ph. 727-403-1551.

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1 Comment

Filed under Missions

One response to “Review: The Ambassadors

  1. Oscar Dykes

    I am interested in the status of Ambassador 11 co-pilot, Bill Taylor. I was a fellow student with him in Central Bible College, Springfield, Mo., in the late l940s. I want to know if he is still living or deceased. If he is still living I want to contact him.

    One of the pilots, Jimmy Adkins, is deceased 2008.

    Any information is greatly appreciated.

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