Briggs Dingman: How an Evangelical Minister Overcame Prejudice Against Pentecostals

This Week in AG History — January 24, 1948

By Darrin J. Rodgers
Originally published on AG-News, 27 January 2022

Briggs P. Dingman (1900-1968) was a renaissance man — he served as a minister, musician, author, linguist, and educator. He spent the first half of his ministry in Methodist, Presbyterian, and Baptist churches and as an officer in the Salvation Army. Much to his own surprise, however, he spent the latter half of his ministry in Pentecostal churches and schools.

Dingman, who shared his testimony in the Jan. 24, 1948, issue of the Pentecostal Evangel, had a broadly informed worldview. He attended Dickinson College, Moody Bible Institute, and Xenia Theological Seminary (a Presbyterian school). He was studious, had a working knowledge of at least five languages, and authored a novel, By Ways Appointed (Moody Press, 1935). Dingman considered himself to be “open-minded” on theological matters. Yet early in his ministry he reflexively rejected Pentecostal claims without first examining them.

It is easy to dismiss people and beliefs, Dingman came to realize, based on a caricature. He had little actual experience with Pentecostals. He had encountered some Pentecostals whom he deemed to be “ultrademonstrative,” and he had read that others handled snakes. He assumed Pentecostals to be deluded or even demon-possessed.

Dingman’s views of Pentecostals began to change when he came into contact with a young Assemblies of God minister. They became friends, and Dingman grew to admire his spiritual life. He felt “forced to admit” that the Assemblies of God preacher and his wife had a closer walk with the Lord than he did.

When Dingman took a different pastorate, he became friends with another Pentecostal minister who was overflowing with joy and spiritual depth. Dingman began developing an internal conflict when it came to Pentecostals — he admired their spirituality but pitied them for believing a “delusion.”

An Assemblies of God pastor who befriended Dingman wisely appealed to Dingman’s desire to be open-minded. He encouraged Dingman to read Assemblies of God literature and to judge for himself whether Pentecostal beliefs were biblical. One of the first books he read was by Robert Chandler Dalton – a Baptist chaplain who had been baptized in the Holy Spirit and who transferred his ordination to the Assemblies of God. Dingman was stunned. Dingman had been a longtime friend of Dalton. 

Dingman voraciously read book after book about Pentecostal beliefs. He came to two conclusions: 1) anti-Pentecostal books were written by people who apparently had very limited knowledge of actual Pentecostal teachings; and 2) Scripture teaches that the baptism of the Holy Spirit often follows conversion. His preconceived anti-Pentecostal prejudices shattered, Dingman determined that he would seek a deeper relationship with God, even if it meant identifying with the Pentecostals.

Shortly afterward, Dingman was baptized in the Holy Spirit. He recounted, “there was no hysterical outburst or extreme manifestation” — his soul was simply flooded by a “real visitation of the Holy Spirit.”

How would Dingman’s former ministry colleagues react? Dingman anticipated criticism: “Doubtless many of my former pastor and laymen friends feel that now I am deluded, but I feel that I may be permitted to exclaim, “Oh, sweet delusion!” 

Dingman explained how the baptism in the Holy Spirit brought him into a deeper relationship with God, wondering how spiritual depth could be called a “delusion.”

He wrote: “If having a continuous spirit of praise to my heavenly Father is delusion, then may it continue! If having a walk with God that was never before so rich, is delusion, then may I grovel in this ignorance until He comes! If having His daily blessings poured out upon my life in measure never before so copious is delusion, then this experience is an anomaly if there ever was one. No, far from suffering from a delusion, I have found the light, and what a light it is!”

Dingman cast his lot with the Pentecostals and never looked back. He transferred his ordination to the Assemblies of God in 1945. He went on to serve as a professor at two Assemblies of God schools: Northeastern Bible Institute (Framingham, Massachusetts) and Southwestern Bible Institute (now Southwestern Assemblies of God University, Waxahachie, Texas). He also taught at Elim Bible Institute (Lima, New York).

Briggs Dingman’s testimony illustrates the prejudice that often existed against early Pentecostals. Despite this prejudice, however, the Pentecostal movement became one of the largest revival and renewal movements in Christian history. Countless people, including seasoned ministers like Dingman, found spiritual depth and renewal within Pentecostalism.

Read Dingman’s article, “Is Pentecost a Delusion?” on pages 3 and 7 of the Jan. 24, 1948, issue of the Pentecostal Evangel.

Also featured in this issue:

• “A Precious Friend, or an Offence – Which is Christ to You?” by Lee Krupnick

• “The Revival in Ireland in 1859” 

And many more!

Click here to read this issue now.

Pentecostal Evangel archived editions courtesy of the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center.

Do you have Pentecostal historical materials that should be preserved? Please consider depositing these materials at the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center (FPHC). The FPHC, located in the Assemblies of God national offices, is the largest Pentecostal archive in the world. We would like to preserve and make your treasures accessible to those who write the history books.

Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center
1445 North Boonville Avenue
Springfield, Missouri 65802 USA
Phone: 417.862.1447 ext. 4400
Toll Free: 877.840.5200
Email: archives@ag.org
Website: www.iFPHC.org

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Jessie Wengler: Prisoner of War and Pioneer Assemblies of God Missionary to Japan

This Week in AG History —January 21, 1928

By Ruthie Edgerly Oberg
Originally published on AG News, 20 January 2022

Jessie Wengler (1887-1958), veteran Assemblies of God (AG) missionary, served for 39 years in Japan. As the only AG missionary to remain in Japan throughout World War II, she held a knowledge of the post-war needs of the nation and a respect from its people that few others could match.

Raised in Clayton, Missouri, Wengler was saved, filled with the Spirit, and called to missions in a Pentecostal meeting in 1909. During the next 10 years, she studied teacher training in Colorado and briefly studied for the ministry at Moody Bible Institute in Chicago and Brooks Bible Institute in St. Louis. She participated in jail and hospital ministry and handed out tracts in street evangelism. With no formal experience as a pastor or evangelist, the AG appointed her as a missionary to the new field of Japan in 1919. She initially went to Yokohama, where she joined Assemblies of God missionaries Barney and Mary Moore, who had arrived the year before.

After language study, the Moores sent Wengler to begin a church in Hachioji, a city of 80,000 close to Tokyo. As the only foreigner in the city, Wengler thought it best to begin reaching out to the children and formed a Sunday School in the home of a neighboring family. The children came along with parents and grandparents. The singing was especially popular, particularly the chorus, “Jesus Loves Me.” Her Bible stories and songs became so popular that the tunes could be heard in the marketplaces throughout her neighborhood. Even the Buddhist leaders took note of her success with the children and soon began teaching their own children to sing, “Buddha Loves Me.” Soon the young daughter of the family hosting Sunday School, Komiko, became Wengler’s assistant and within 10 years, the church had built a large building and Komiko was serving as pastor.

In 1928, Wengler wrote to her supporters in The Pentecostal Evangel, sharing how their new building had escaped a fire that burned down a building not four feet from their assembly. She wrote, “The little chapel stands in the burnt district a testimony to the delivering power of God.” Wengler had no idea that an even greater fire was coming that would affect her and her believing friends in a way that they could never have imagined.

The church sponsored other new church plants and Wengler felt that she could move to Toyko to help build the work there. She soon noticed a shift as the atmosphere became charged with a national patriotism that had not been as prevalent before. Pressure was mounting on Japanese churches to conform to the national image. “Thought Police” began to work to unify the thoughts, actions, and behavior of the Japanese people.

As war conditions in Asia and Europe caused concern around the world, AG missions leader Noel Perkin ordered all missionaries to return to the United States in mid-1941. Unfortunately, Wengler had been confined to a hospital bed for several months from overwork, anemia, and a heart condition. Too weak to make the trip home, Wengler was the only AG missionary to remain in Japan and was there during the bombing of Pearl Harbor in December 1941.

Partially paralyzed on her left side, the Japanese government did not place Wengler in an internment camp as they had with most Americans. She was placed under house arrest and allowed to walk to the market. Her home was searched for contraband and the land she owned was confiscated. Her Japanese friends were not allowed to visit her, although some came to bring her needed resources during the darkness of night. By the second year of the war, her rations were reduced to ¾-cup of rice and a few leaves of vegetables, which had to last for three to four days. Her weight dropped from a normal 124 pounds to less than 90 pounds. She was unable to communicate with the United States, so the AG missions department did not hear from her for four years and did not know if she was dead or alive.

Wengler faced much pressure from her neighbors to fly the Japanese flag on the monthly Rescript Day, the eighth day of each month to honor the day war was declared on the United States. She responded that as an American she could not, in good conscience, celebrate the beginning of the war nor could she recognize the emperor as god in the national celebrations. Through this time, she continued to love her neighbors and serve as a Christian example.

In 1944, American B-29s began dropping thousands of incendiary devices, focusing heavily around Tokyo. Wengler was moved by the military several times until, finally, she was housed with five Baptist missionaries interned in the city. Wengler described the March 1945 bombing: “Bombs were falling like rain all around us. Soon the whole neighborhood was a roaring inferno. No matter which way we turned to flee it seemed we were walking on fire. I cannot describe the terror. The exploding bombs, the roaring fire, the screaming people. We ran through a wall of fire to the school building where we stayed all night. In the morning we returned to find that while homes next to ours were completely destroyed, ours was still standing.”

After the war ended, Tokyo was devastated. 100,000 residents had been killed and one million were left homeless, making the March bombing the most destructive single air attack in human history. The Japanese people were dazed, confused, and exhausted. Wengler longed to serve her people but was sent back to the States in late 1945 to rest and give reports. When she returned to Japan in 1947, she served as the AG representative to the Allied powers until the final peace treaty was signed in 1951.

Wengler worked tirelessly until her death in 1958, at age 71, to help the Japanese people and to rebuild their church. She conducted Bible classes for university students and led many people to Christ who became leaders. Upon her death, she left her life insurance money to build a church in Ichikawa City and was buried with honors by her friends in Karuizawa Cemetery.

Read Wengler’s report on the Hachioji fire, “Quenched the Violence of Fire” on page 9 of the Jan. 21, 1928, issue of the Pentecostal Evangel.

Also featured in this issue:

• “The Sin of Resisting the Holy Ghost” by A.G. Jeffries

• “Are the Gifts of the Holy Spirit for Today?” by Donald Gee

And many more!

Click here to read this issue now.

Pentecostal Evangel archived editions courtesy of the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center.

Do you have Pentecostal historical materials that should be preserved? Please consider depositing these materials at the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center (FPHC). The FPHC, located in the Assemblies of God national offices, is the largest Pentecostal archive in the world. We would like to preserve and make your treasures accessible to those who write the history books.

Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center
1445 North Boonville Avenue
Springfield, Missouri 65802 USA
Phone: 417.862.1447 ext. 4400
Toll Free: 877.840.5200
Email: archives@ag.org
Website: www.iFPHC.org

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How Should Christians Respond to Global Turmoil? Three Pentecostal Responses to the Attack on Pearl Harbor

This Week in AG History — January 10, 1942

By Darrin J. Rodgers
Originally published on AG-News, 13 January 2022

The Imperial Japanese Navy conducted a surprise military strike on the United States naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on the morning of December 7, 1941. The following day the United States declared war on Japan, and within a few days America was fully embroiled in the Second World War.

How should the Assemblies of God respond to this world crisis? The January 10, 1942, issue of the Pentecostal Evangel published three articles addressing this pressing question.

Pentecostal Evangel Editor Stanley H. Frodsham, in an article titled, “Keeping Tranquil in a World of Turmoil,” cautioned believers to not become caught up in the destructive patterns of the world. He predicted that the “insanity” of the nations would not last forever and instead urged Christians to remain calm. He admonished readers to act according to an eternal perspective, reminding them of Matthew 5:5, “the meek shall inherit the earth.” Frodsham’s irenic posture during the early years of the Second World War was in continuity with his earlier opposition to the First World War (1914-1918).

Raymond T. Richey shared a different perspective about the war. In an article titled, “Evangelizing at our Army Camps,” he wrote about his experience as a military chaplain during both world wars. Richey was known for holding evangelistic meetings in his “patriotic tent” (which was constructed of red, white and blue cloth) and he saw thousands of soldiers accept Christ. He encouraged readers to pray for and support chaplains, suggesting that army camps “present the greatest opportunity for home missionary work that ever has been.”

Evangelist E. Ellsworth Krogstad, in a sermon titled “Loyalty to Government and to God in the Present World Crisis,” encouraged American Christians to be loyal to their government, which he claimed was “founded upon godly principles.” He acknowledged America’s imperfections, but he also “(thanked) God for the privilege of living in America.” America was great, according to Krogstad, because it provided the “greatest liberty,” including freedom of speech, press, assembly, and worship.

The responses to the outbreak of the Second World War by Frodsham, Richey, and Krogstad demonstrate that early Pentecostals were not cookie-cutter thinkers. Frodsham promoted pacifism, Richey was known for his patriotism, and Krogstad emphasized the blessings of American liberty. They each had their own perspectives on politics and world events. However, all agreed that American Christians needed to pray fervently and with great contrition. They took seriously the notion that the Christian’s citizenship, ultimately, lay in heaven and not on earth. It was with this deep conviction that they encouraged readers, in the midst of global turmoil, to place their primary focus on things eternal.

Read the articles by Frodsham, Richey, and Krogstad in the January 10, 1942, issue of the Pentecostal Evangel.

Also featured in this issue:

* “Watchmen, What of the Night?” by Noel Perkin

* “Ezra Teaches Separation,” by J. Bashford Bishop

* “The Sadhu,” by Mary Warburton Booth

And many more!

Click here to read this issue now.

Pentecostal Evangel archived editions courtesy of the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center.

Do you have Pentecostal historical materials that should be preserved? Please consider depositing these materials at the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center (FPHC). The FPHC, located in the Assemblies of God national offices, is the largest Pentecostal archive in the world. We would like to preserve and make your treasures accessible to those who write the history books.

Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center
1445 North Boonville Avenue
Springfield, Missouri 65802 USA
Phone: 417.862.1447 ext. 4400
Toll Free: 877.840.5200
Email: archives@ag.org
Website: www.iFPHC.org

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In 1964, Thomas F. Zimmerman Encouraged the Assemblies of God to Focus on These Four Themes

This Week in AG History — January 5, 1964

By Glenn W. Gohr
Originally published on AG-News, 6 January 2022

In January 1964, General Superintendent Thomas F. Zimmerman encouraged Assemblies of God members to focus on four areas in the new year: 1) pray for a renewed Pentecost in our personal lives; 2) recognize the urgency of saving the lost; 3) equip ourselves to win the lost through prayer, reading the Scriptures, and training; and 4) be diligent to do the work of the Kingdom.

Zimmerman’s admonition was written in anticipation of the 50th anniversary of the Assemblies of God. His article in the Pentecostal Evangel, “Our Fiftieth Year,” told of the significance of the Pentecostal revival which took place at the turn of the 20th century as well as the influence of the Azusa Street revival in Los Angeles, which greatly impacted the world. He made reference to the approximately 300 persons who met in Hot Springs, Arkansas, in April 1914 to organize the Assemblies of God. He wrote, “The founding fathers of our Movement laid a foundation strong and sure.” He acknowledged that the Assemblies of God has an illustrious history, but he tempered this by saying, “We must not glory too much in the past lest we forget our situation today and the work that is yet to be done.”

Zimmerman emphasized, “One of the factors in the growth of our Movement during its early years was the sense of urgency to evangelize the world. This same burden is needed for continued growth.” Although programs and procedures are helpful, he said, “The greatest need today is for men and women who will dedicate themselves to labor faithfully.” “Nothing short of a full mobilization under God, and an overflowing power of Holy Ghost power, will suffice,” declared Zimmerman.

These same principles apply today as the Assemblies of God approaches its 108th anniversary.

Read “Our Fiftieth Year” on pages 3-4 of the Jan. 5, 1964, issue of the Pentecostal Evangel.

Also featured in this issue:

• “I Remember,” by Ernest S. Williams.

• “Miracle at Caracas,” by Mrs. Elmer C. Niles.

• “A Call to Prayer.”

And many more!

Click here to read this issue now.

Pentecostal Evangel archived editions courtesy of the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center.

Do you have Pentecostal historical materials that should be preserved? Please consider depositing these materials at the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center (FPHC). The FPHC, located in the Assemblies of God national offices, is the largest Pentecostal archive in the world. We would like to preserve and make your treasures accessible to those who write the history books.

Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center
1445 North Boonville Avenue
Springfield, Missouri 65802 USA
Phone: 417.862.1447 ext. 4400
Toll Free: 877.840.5200
Email: archives@ag.org
Website: www.iFPHC.org

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Eight Rules for a Happy Marriage (According to C. M. Ward)

This Week in AG History — December 30, 1956

By Glenn W. Gohr
Originally published on AG-News, 30 December 2021

Sixty-five years ago, C. M. Ward delivered a sermon over the Revivaltime radio program titled “Eight Rules for a Happy Marriage.” Ward was known for his direct, practical, and biblical messages, often laced with humor. His sermons covered a broad spectrum of subjects pertaining to daily life.

Ward is best remembered as the longtime speaker for Revivaltime, the radio ministry of the Assemblies of God. The program started in 1950, but when Ward became the speaker in December 1953 the program began airing on the ABC radio network and covered 275 stations. Within a year, Ward’s dynamic ministry caused the broadcast to be given major ratings by ABC officials, who listed it as the top religious program in many parts of the country. Over the next 25 years (1953-1978), Ward preached more than 1,300 weekly radio broadcasts on over 650 stations.

While Ward’s radio address “Eight Rules for a Happy Marriage” first aired in 1956, his observations continue to be of interest to husbands and wives today.

Ward stressed that marriage is a partnership. He called it a “contract of trust entirely based on love.” He tied this into the message of 1 Corinthians 7:3: “Let the husband render unto the wife due benevolence: and likewise also the wife unto the husband.”

The first rule that Ward listed was that “Life’s partnership calls for a family altar.” He mentioned the time-proven adage, “Families that pray together stay together.” He strongly advised, “A partnership in the Lord must include the practice of Bible reading and praying together if God’s fullness of blessing is to be the daily experience in the home life.”

Next Ward declared, “Life’s partnership calls for a sense of safety.” By this he meant that a husband and wife should be able to “safely trust” in each other. They should be able to discuss business matters, money affairs, and private thoughts with each other without having to worry about things being shared with others. Certain things need to be kept in confidence.

The third rule he shared was “Life’s partnership calls for an understanding about money.” Ward emphasized that in order to avoid misunderstandings about money, a couple should not have separate money accounts. Instead, all monies should be seen as “ours.” Share and share alike.

Fourthly, Ward declared, “Life’s partnership does not include relatives.” He said it is good to be on good terms with in-laws and other relatives, but they should not be allowed to manage or influence personal matters that pertain to a marriage partnership. A couple’s home life should not be controlled by outside forces.

The fifth rule said, “Life’s partnership calls for a will.” Ward suggested that a couple should talk about their future — including the possibility of death. He encouraged couples to make a will and keep it updated. It is best to be prepared for end-of-life decisions as well as day-to-day activities.

Sixthly, “Life’s partnership calls for fellowship.” Marriage is not a silent partnership. There must be conversation. Ward’s suggestion was not to bore your spouse, but wisely choose the topics of discussion. He said to “Season your meals with bright, constructive, cheery, Christ-honoring conversation.” It can keep your partnership alive.

The seventh rule stated, “Life’s partnership calls for cooperation.” There is no room in a marriage for rivalry. Ward said, “There is a secret in finding happiness in the happiness of another.” Instead of criticizing a project your spouse is doing, encourage them to do what is important to them, even it is not the type of project you would do. Ward said, “Let there be room for personal expression.”

The final rule promoted the idea that “Life partnership calls for spiritual union.” Marriage is meant to be a partnership in spiritual matters. The marriage oath was taken in the name of the Trinity, and God should remain primary in the marriage relationship. If at all possible, a couple should plan to sit together in church and be united in their religious convictions. “A house divided . . . cannot stand.” Most of all, he emphasized that “Jesus Christ is concerned about your marriage.”

Read C. M. Ward’s sermon, “Eight Rules for a Happy Marriage,” which was published on page 8 of the Dec. 30, 1956, issue of the Pentecostal Evangel.

Also featured in this issue:

• “A New Life for the New Year,” by Atwood Foster

• “Be of Good Courage,” by Marie Brown

• “What Price Alaska?” by James Reb

And many more!

Click here to read this issue now.

Pentecostal Evangel archived editions courtesy of the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center.

Do you have Pentecostal historical materials that should be preserved? Please consider depositing these materials at the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center (FPHC). The FPHC, located in the Assemblies of God national offices, is the largest Pentecostal archive in the world. We would like to preserve and make your treasures accessible to those who write the history books.

Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center
1445 North Boonville Avenue
Springfield, Missouri 65802 USA
Phone: 417.862.1447 ext. 4400
Toll Free: 877.840.5200
Email: archives@ag.org
Website: www.iFPHC.org

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Lillian Trasher: Serving the Widows and Orphans of Egypt

This Week in AG History — December 21, 1935

By Glenn W. Gohr
Originally published on AG-News, 23 December 2021

Assemblies of God missionary Lillian Trasher, in a 1935 Pentecostal Evangel article, celebrated the 25th anniversary of her arrival in Egypt. She testified of God’s provision for the Assiout Orphanage, which she founded in 1911: “He has never failed me all these years and we are being fed like the sparrows, who have no barns or storerooms. Seven hundred little ones. We are still looking to the Lord for our hourly needs. O! He is such a wonderful Saviour!”

Lillian Hunt Trasher (1887-1961) was born in Jacksonville, Florida, and grew up in Brunswick, Georgia. She accepted the Lord at a young age, and as a 9-year-old she prayed, “Lord, if ever I can do anything for you, just let me know and I will do it.” Little did she know at the time where that initial commitment would lead.

A few years later her family moved to Asheville, North Carolina, where she was invited by evangelist Mattie Perry to work in a nearby orphanage, which cared for about 100 children. Trasher’s love for children soon led her to accept this invitation. During her apprenticeship at the orphanage, she learned how to make clothes, care for infants, and teach children — all on a shoestring budget. This experience would prepare her for her life’s calling in Egypt.

She left the orphanage to study for one year at a Bible school in Cincinnati, Ohio, and then traveled for a time as an evangelist. In her travels, she met George S. Brelsford, a missionary working in Assiout, Egypt, and the door opened for her to sail to Egypt as a missionary in 1910. At that time she had no mission board to support her, but she received gifts from friends and offerings from churches.

Residing with other missionaries at Brelsford’s mission, she began to study the Arabic language and pondered the course of her ministry. A few months later, she was called to the bed of a dying woman who had a small baby that was left an orphan. Lillian took care of this baby, and this led to the establishment of what today is known as the Lillian Trasher Orphanage in Assiout, Egypt.

During the 50 years that Lillian operated the orphanage, thousands of Egyptian children and families received food, clothing, housing, spiritual nurture, and education. This won her the respect of the Egyptian government, as well as the international community. Since 1911, the Lillian Trasher Orphanage has provided hope and a loving home to more than 25,000 children. In 1919, Lillian Trasher affiliated with the Assemblies of God. She previously held credentials as an evangelist with the Church of God (Cleveland, Tennessee). Because of her tireless work with orphans in Egypt, she is fondly remembered as “Mama Lillian” or “Mother of the Nile.”

Read the entire article, “Assiout Orphanage: A Testimony of God’s Faithfulness,” on page 11 of the Dec. 21, 1935, issue of the Pentecostal Evangel.

Also featured in this issue:

• “The Coming of Immanuel,” by Ernest S. Williams

• “The Revival That Was Born in a Christmas Convention,” by Mary Martin

• “The Christmas Message,” by D. H. McDowell

• “Marvelous Miracles in France,” by Douglas R. Scott

And many more!

Click here to read this issue now.

Pentecostal Evangel archived editions courtesy of Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center.

Do you have Pentecostal historical materials that should be preserved? Please consider depositing these materials at the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center (FPHC). The FPHC, located in the Assemblies of God national offices, is the largest Pentecostal archive in the world. We would like to preserve and make your treasures accessible to those who write the history books.

Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center
1445 North Boonville Avenue
Springfield, Missouri 65802 USA
Phone: 417.862.1447 ext. 4400
Toll Free: 877.840.5200
Email: archives@ag.org
Website: www.iFPHC.org

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105th Anniversary of the Statement of Fundamental Truths: How the Assemblies of God Developed its Doctrinal Statement

D. W. Kerr

This Week in AG History —December 16, 1916

By Ruthie Edgerly Oberg
Originally published on AG News, 16 December 2021

When the December 1913 call came for the organizational General Council of the Assemblies of God to be held in April 1914, the foremost reason given was to “come together … that by prayer and study of the Word of God, and guidance of the Holy Spirit, we may get a better understanding of what He would have us teach, and thus do away with many divisions over doctrines …” The 1914 General Council adopted no formal creed concerning “what to teach” but rather stated that “the holy inspired Scriptures are the all-sufficient rule for faith and doctrine.”

Early Pentecostals saw themselves as part of a restorationist movement returning to the primitive nature of the faith and practice of the early Christian Church as found in the book of Acts. Like the 16th century reformers, they believed that any religious standard of authority outside the Scriptures was void. Many also embraced the spirit that followed the awakening revivals of the 1800s: they should teach the Bible while having “no creed but Christ.”

The Pentecostals were also a movement that believed in the restoration of the gifts of the Spirit. While all Pentecostals affirmed the authority of Scripture, some also demonstrated a proclivity toward viewing spiritual revelations as a competing, rather than complementary, source of authority. Some preachers felt pressure to produce “new light” and “fresh insights” as proof of anointing in their exposition of the Scripture.

One such insight was the “revelation of the power of Jesus’ name” that swept through the early Movement, beginning in 1913. This “New Issue” addressed the idea that Peter received a revelation in Acts 2:38 that the “name of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, was the name of Jesus.” This understanding led to many being re-baptized in Jesus’ name only, and to the teaching that Jesus was the name as the Father and the Holy Spirit, rather than the historically orthodox teaching of the Trinity, “one God in three persons.”

The teaching threatened to rend the new Movement in twain. While there had been a generally agreed upon policy that anyone with a new teaching would not advance it until he was amid “a multitude of counsellors” where it could be considered with confidence by others, the “New Issue” proponents had begun preaching the Oneness doctrine widely. Both publications of the Assemblies of God, the monthly Word and Witness and the Weekly Evangel (later The Pentecostal Evangel) sought to respond to this teaching in the spring and summer of 1915. These articles were very careful not to speak as official voices of the Assemblies of God but instead to advise from scriptural views, allowing their readers to determine their own understanding.

The debate soon became so divisive that a call came for a third General Council to be held in October 1915. There was a free discussion of the new issue as leader after leader spoke their convictions on the matter. From this came a statement that sought to apply “the spirit and liberality” of the Hot Springs declaration that the Scriptures are the only source of authoritative doctrine. The statement leaned toward the Trinitarian position but also stated that “no line of Christian fellowship or of ministerial fellowship” should be drawn by differences on the matter of a baptismal formula.

Despite this attempt at maintaining unity, the division over the issue only grew. A fourth General Council was called for October 1916, with one of the main items on the agenda being the settlement of the stance of the Assemblies of God as to its approved doctrines, especially on the person of Jesus Christ and the Trinity.

A committee of five was appointed to report to the Council, including E.N. Bell, D.W. Kerr, T.K. Leonard, S.A. Jamieson, and Stanley Frodsham. Kerr had spent much time in study on the issue and came to the Council prepared with copious notes, allowing the committee to prepare a statement in a relatively short amount of time.

The statement delineated 17 points of doctrine. Each point was presented, debated, and voted upon separately. Point 13, “The Essentials As To the Godhead,” contained 10 subpoints, coming down solidly on the side of Trinitarian teaching, and showing the high importance they placed upon this particular doctrine. Other topics addressed were the Scriptures, the fall and salvation of man, the baptism in the Holy Spirit, sanctification, healing, the church and its ministry, ordinances, and the return of Christ. The Dec. 16, 1916, issue of the Weekly Evangel presented the first printed installment of this “Statement of Fundamental Truths” on Page 8. The article contends that this statement “is not intended as a creed for the church, nor as a basis of fellowship among Christians, but only as a basis of unity for the ministry alone.”

These actions forced the removal of the Oneness proponents and established the course of doctrinal belief for the Assemblies of God until the present. While there have been several revisions, renumberings, addition of Scripture passages, updated language, and simplification of phrases, the Statement of Fundamental Truths has remained unchanged at its core since its adoption in 1916. For a more complete discussion of revisions to the document, see “The Historical Development of the Statement of Fundamental Truths” by Glenn Gohr in the 2012 edition of Assemblies of God Heritage.

Read the report “A Statement of Fundamental Truths Approved by the Council” on Page 8 of the Dec. 16, 1916, issue of the Pentecostal Evangel.

Also featured in this issue:

• “I Fell in Love with the Nazarene” by Sarah Payne

• “Questions and Answers” by E.N. Bell

• “The Bible” by D. W. Kerr

And many more!

Click here to read this issue now.

Pentecostal Evangel
archived editions courtesy of the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center.

Do you have Pentecostal historical materials that should be preserved? Please consider depositing these materials at the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center (FPHC). The FPHC, located in the Assemblies of God national offices, is the largest Pentecostal archive in the world. We would like to preserve and make your treasures accessible to those who write the history books.

Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center
1445 North Boonville Avenue
Springfield, Missouri 65802 USA
Phone: 417.862.1447 ext. 4400
Toll Free: 877.840.5200
Email: archives@ag.org
Website: www.iFPHC.org

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Maria Gerber: How a Pentecostal Missionary Became an “Angel of Mercy” During the Armenian Genocide

This Week in AG History —December 4, 1915

By Darrin J. Rodgers
Originally published on AG-News, 09 December 2021

An estimated 800,000 to 1,500,000 ethnic Armenians living in the Ottoman Empire (present day Turkey) were systematically rounded up and killed by Ottoman authorities between the years 1915 and 1918. The Armenian Genocide, as it came to be known, is the second-most studied case of genocide, following the Jewish Holocaust.

Newspapers around the world reported on the suffering endured by the mostly Christian Armenians. Right in the midst of the conflict was Maria A. Gerber (1858-1917), an early Pentecostal missionary who had established an orphanage in Turkey for Armenian victims.

Gerber was born in Switzerland, where she was raised with 11 siblings by Mennonite parents. As a child, she did not have an interest in spiritual things, because she saw her mother weep when she read her Bible. She thought that Scripture must be the cause of sadness.

Gerber was a carefree child and loved to sing and dance. But, at age 12, she was stricken with multiple ailments, including rheumatic fever, heart trouble, tuberculosis, and dropsy. The doctor’s prognosis was not good — Gerber only had a short time to live.

Fear gripped Gerber’s heart. She had never committed her life to the Lord. She knew that if she died, she would not go to heaven. Gerber cried out, “Jesus, I want you to save me from my sins.” Immediately, she felt peace deep inside her soul. She was ready to die.

But God had other plans for the young girl. Gerber quickly recovered from her incurable illness, much to everyone’s surprise. Gerber’s mother had been so confident that her daughter was on death’s doorstep that she had already given away all of her clothing. Her mother scrounged around and found clothes for Gerber.

Gerber shared her testimony of salvation and healing at school and in surrounding villages. She found her calling. She read Matthew 28:18 and sensed that verse was meant for her: “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me [Jesus]. Go therefore and make disciples of all nations…”

Gerber’s faith deepened as she blossomed into a young woman. She received training as a nurse, but in her heart she wanted to become a missionary. In 1889 a remarkable revival featuring healing and speaking in tongues came to her town in Switzerland. In her 1917 autobiography, Passed Experiences, Present Conditions, Hope for the Future, Gerber recounted the rapturous praise and numerous miracles that occurred in that early Swiss revival.

The young nurse wanted training for missions work and, in 1891, she headed for Chicago, where she attended Moody Bible Institute. By the mid-1890s, she heard about massacres of Armenian Christians that were occurring in the Ottoman Empire. Gerber and a friend, Rose Lambert, felt God calling them to minister to the Armenian widows and orphans.

Gerber and Lambert arrived in Turkey in 1898 and began working with the besieged Armenians. They began caring for orphans and purchased camel loads of cotton for widows to make garments for the orphans and for sale. Donors from America and Europe began supporting these two audacious women who had ventured into very dangerous territory to do the Lord’s work.

Gerber, in particular, found support among wealthy German Mennonites who lived in Russia. In 1904, they funded the construction of a series of large buildings to house hundreds of orphans and widows. Zion Orphans’ Home, located near Caesarea, became a hub of relief work and ministry in central Turkey. When persecution of Armenians intensified in 1915, resulting in the extermination of most Christian Armenians from Turkey, Zion Orphans’ Home was ready to help those in distress.

Gerber identified with the emerging Pentecostal movement as early as 1910. This should not be surprising, as she had experienced her own Pentecost 21 years earlier. The Assemblies of God supported her missions efforts, and numerous letters by Gerber were published in the Pentecostal Evangel. Assemblies of God leader D.W. Kerr, in the foreword to Gerber’s 1917 autobiography, wrote that he had known Gerber for 26 years and that her story will encourage readers “to greater self-denial and a deeper surrender.”

Gerber suffered a stroke and passed away on Dec. 6, 1917. Gerber’s obituary, published in the Pentecostal Evangel, stated that she was known as “the angel of mercy to the downtrodden Armenians.”

It would have been easy for Gerber to ignore the persecution of Armenians. The massacres were on the other side of the world. She could have stayed safe in America or in Europe. But Gerber followed God’s call and spent almost 20 years ministering to refugees who faced persecution and death. Few people today remember her name. But according to early Assemblies of God leaders, Maria Gerber personified what it meant to be Pentecostal.

Read one of Gerber’s articles, “Great Results Seen in Answer to Prayer,” on page 4 of the Dec. 4, 1915, issue of the Pentecostal Evangel.

Also featured in this issue:

• “Divine Love: The Supreme Test,” by Arch P. Collins

• “What Think Ye of Christ?” by M. M. Pinson

And many more!

Click here to read this issue now.

Read Maria A. Gerber’s obituary in the Jan. 5, 1918, edition of the Pentecostal Evangel (p. 13).

Pentecostal Evangel archived editions courtesy of the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center.

Do you have Pentecostal historical materials that should be preserved? Please consider depositing these materials at the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center (FPHC). The FPHC, located in the Assemblies of God national offices, is the largest Pentecostal archive in the world. We would like to preserve and make your treasures accessible to those who write the history books.

Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center
1445 North Boonville Avenue
Springfield, Missouri 65802 USA
Phone: 417.862.1447 ext. 4400
Toll Free: 877.840.5200
Email: archives@ag.org
Website: www.iFPHC.org

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Charles W.H. Scott: The Assemblies of God Pioneer With a Heart for Church Planting

This Week in AG History — December 2, 1956

By Glenn W. Gohr

Originally published on AG News, 02 December 2021

Charles W.H. Scott (1904-1993) served the Assemblies of God with distinction as a church planter, executive presbyter, district official, and as an assistant general superintendent where he had oversight of a number of important AG ministries.

Born in Arundel, Quebec, Canada, Charles Scott attended public school in Montreal and attended two years at Rochester Bible Training School in New York (1922-1924). He also attended Princeton Theological Seminary, Princeton, New Jersey (1925-1926). His first pastorate was in Trenton, New Jersey, in 1924. He was ordained with the Eastern District of the Assemblies of God on June 14, 1925. He married Gertrude V. Northrop in Rochester, New York, on Oct. 16, 1926.

In 1927 the Scotts pioneered a church at Altoona, Pennsylvania, followed by pioneer works at Tyrone, Roaring Springs, and Lebanon, Pennsylvania. While serving as pastor of Riverside Tabernacle, Flint, Michigan (1933-1941), through the vision and energy of the Scotts, several nearby towns received their first Pentecostal witness. These included Bethel Tabernacle (on the east side of Flint), Goodrich, Lapeer, and Owosso, Michigan. The Scotts also pastored in Atlantic City, New Jersey (1929-1933), where the Scotts broadcast the Sunshine Gospel Program, and Church of the Four-Fold Gospel (AG) in Battle Creek, Michigan (1941-1945).

Scott served as a district presbyter for the Central District from 1938 to 1945 and was an executive presbyter from 1954 until his retirement in 1971.

When the Michigan district was organized in 1945, Scott was elected superintendent. During his time as superintendent, the Michigan District opened 90 new churches. Scott held that post for 12 years.

From 1957-1971, Scott served as an assistant general superintendent of the Assemblies of God. He was an executive director for Home Missions (now U.S. Missions), Benevolences, Ministers Benefit Association, Sunday School, the Education Department, and the Men’s department. One major home missions activity under his direction was new church evangelism. More than 900 new Assemblies of God churches were opened during his six years as director of Home Missions (1966-1971).

Scott’s first initiative as Home Missions director was called “Branch Out,” which encouraged local churches to branch out beyond their four walls and plant churches, as well as ministering to needy people groups. He focused on reaching Native Americans, the deaf culture, the blind, and those with drug and other addictions.

Under Scott’s leadership, the missions work in Puerto Rico was placed under the authority of the Home Missions Department. He and Curtis Ringness, director of Special Ministries, began to aggressively pursue building churches in Puerto Rico, and they were aided by a Spirit-filled businessman who donated two choice properties in Puerto Rico which were used for planting churches.

In the late 1950s, Burton Pierce, the director of the AG’s Men’s Fellowship, noticed that many young boys were drifting away from the local church. He declared, “Our number-one priority is to get men involved in soul winning and the discipling of boys.” In 1960, Scott suggested the name, “Royal Rangers,” for such a discipleship program, and two years later, the Royal Rangers program was inaugurated with Johnnie Barnes as the first Royal Rangers national commander.

In addition to church planting, Charles Scott was a large proponent of Christian higher education in the Assemblies of God. When Evangel College (now Evangel University) began classes in 1955, while still superintendent of the Michigan District, Scott served as the first chairman of the board of directors.

During 1959 Charles Scott and Cordas C. Burnett, national education secretary, compiled a thorough analysis on the need for a seminary in the Assemblies of God. This eventually led to the establishment of the Assemblies of God Theological Seminary. Scott served as chairman of the board for American Indian Bible College (now SAGU-American Indian College) and also served as a board member for Central Bible College and Northeast Bible Institute (now The University of Valley Forge). Both Evangel College and American Indian Bible College honored him by naming campus buildings after him. He also served as chairman of the board for Hillcrest Children’s Home in Hot Springs, Arkansas, and Highlands Child Placement Services in Kansas City, Missouri.

At Scott’s retirement in 1971, Curtis Ringness said, “It is the prerogative of God, both to call and to qualify a man to be a successful minister of the gospel. Charles W. H. Scott has steadfastly maintained the distinction and dignity of his calling. His deportment has always been correct, his character pure, and his spirit excellent. The strength of his faith and his dedication to the cause of Christ have been an inspiration to all who know him.”

In later years, when approaching their seventies, the Scotts moved to Sun City, Arizona, to pioneer Evangel Church for nine years (1972-1981). The church began with services in private homes until a more permanent building could be established. At a time in life when most people plan to gear down activities, Charles Scott launched a fund-raising program to purchase property and construct a new building. The first services were held in the new church sanctuary on Easter Sunday of 1977. The church grew to about 150 people while Scott was pastor.

The Scotts moved back to Springfield, Missouri, in 1985 to live at Maranatha Village, where he passed away on Jan. 3, 1993. His wife, Gertrude, passed away in 1996.

General Superintendent G. Raymond Carlson said of Charles Scott, “His contribution to God’s work and the Assemblies of God cannot be measured by words. He had an illustrious career of service to the Lord and our Fellowship.”

Read Charles W. H. Scott’s article, “World Crisis and Coming Events,” on page 3 of the Dec. 2, 1956, issue of the Pentecostal Evangel.

Also featured in this issue:

• “God’s Plan for Palestine,” by Robert C. Cunningham

• “God is Still on the Throne,” by Ralph M. Riggs

• “Christian Conduct in View of Christ’s Coming,” by J. Bashford Bishop

And many more!

Click here to read this issue now.

Pentecostal Evangel
archived editions courtesy of the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center.

Do you have Pentecostal historical materials that should be preserved? Please consider depositing these materials at the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center (FPHC). The FPHC, located in the Assemblies of God national offices, is the largest Pentecostal archive in the world. We would like to preserve and make your treasures accessible to those who write the history books.

Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center
1445 North Boonville Avenue
Springfield, Missouri 65802 USA
Phone: 417.862.1447 ext. 4400
Toll Free: 877.840.5200
Email: archives@ag.org
Website: www.iFPHC.org

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Pentecostal Pioneer Katherine Voronaev Escaped USSR 61 Years Ago, Revealed Horrors of Persecution

Mugshot of Katherine Voronaev during her imprisonment in Soviet slave labor camps, circa 1930s

This Week in AG History —November 27, 1960

By Darrin J. Rodgers
Originally published on AG-News, 24 November 2021

Ivan and Katherine Voronaev, pioneer Assemblies of God missionaries to the Soviet Union, were exiled to Siberian prison camps in the 1930s and believed to be dead. But 61 years ago, Katherine was released and made her way to New York City. She shared her story in 1960 with Pentecostal Evangel readers, offering a rare glimpse into the life of persecuted Christians under Soviet rule.

The Voronaevs spent much of their adult lives as fugitives or in prison. Ivan and Katherine fled Russia, the land of their birth, in 1908 after Ivan was court-martialed and threatened with a politicized trial and likely death. His crime? Ivan, a young officer in the Tsar’s army, had recently converted to Christ and felt conviction that he should no longer fight as a professional warrior. He laid down his arms and told his superiors that, from then on, his only weapon “would be the Word of God — the Gospel of Jesus Christ.” The Voronaevs ended up in America in 1912 by way of Turkmenistan and Manchuria.

In the U.S., Ivan became a Baptist pastor and evangelist and ministered among Slavic immigrants in San Francisco and Seattle. In 1917, Voronaev moved to New York City to accept the pastorate of a small Russian Baptist congregation. Two years later, Voronaev’s daughter, Vera, was Spirit-baptized and spoke in tongues while attending Glad Tidings Tabernacle, an Assemblies of God church, with a friend. Voronaev began to study Scripture and became convinced that supernatural spiritual gifts did not cease, but continued to be available to Christians. Spiritually hungry, Voronaev prayed for and received a similar experience. In the summer of 1919, Voronaev and about 20 others formed a new Pentecostal congregation — the Russian Christian Apostolic Mission in New York.

Several months later at a home prayer meeting, Voronaev received a prophetic message, “Voronaev, Voronaev, go to Russia!” He ignored the message at first, but after he sensed the same message in his personal devotions, he made preparations to return to his homeland. This would not be an easy task. The Tsar recently had been overthrown, and political, religious, and social turmoil had produced much suffering in Russia. Voronaev joined the Assemblies of God and received official appointment as a missionary. With several Slavic families from his congregation, they made the arduous journey back to Eastern Europe.

Voronaev and his team of missionaries left the United States in 1920 and set up their headquarters in Odessa, Ukraine. They fanned out across the Soviet Union, preached the gospel, and established Pentecostal churches. In 1926, Voronaev organized the General-Ukrainian Union of Christians of Evangelical Faith, which provided fellowship for the growing number of churches. By 1928, the Union consisted of about 400 congregations with approximately 20,000 members.

U.S. Assemblies of God churches provided financial and prayer support, including money for bicycles for Slavic ministers. Voronaev regularly wrote English-language reports of the Slavic revival, which American supporters read in the Pentecostal Evangel.

The Voronaevs and their ministerial cohorts enjoyed about 10 years of freedom to evangelize across the Soviet Union. Then, in January 1930, authorities arrested all of the officers and many other leaders of the Union, including Voronaev.

Katherine Voronaev, in the 1960 Pentecostal Evangel article, recalled in painful detail how “the communists herded the 800 pastors and Christian leaders into freight cars as though they were cattle and shipped them to Siberia.” She continued: “The horrors of that journey were indescribable. They had no food nor water, no sanitation, no provision for rest, and poor ventilation. The survivors were then forced into slave labor.”

The Soviet authorities thought that the churches would die if their leaders were taken away. But new leaders emerged. Katherine Voronaev was among those who began ministering secretly, but three years later police came and arrested her and sent her to a slave labor camp located 2,000 miles away from her husband.

Katherine later made an appeal to be placed in the same slave labor camp as Ivan. The request was granted, and for three years they were able to live together in prison. They spent long days doing hard labor — Ivan in a forest and quarry, and Katherine doing cooking and scrubbing. But they could be together at night when, under the cloak of darkness, they would take long walks through the snow in a forest. They prayed and praised God during those times, and “heaven seemed very near.” Life was hard, but Katherine recounted that they were not unhappy. They had each other.

Meanwhile, the U.S. Assemblies of God made great efforts to secure the release of the Voronaevs. The Soviet government told the Americans that they would free Voronaev upon payment of a large sum of money. U.S. Assemblies of God members raised the money, which they gave to the Soviet government. Voronaev was temporarily freed in 1936, but almost immediately he was rearrested and was never heard from again.

Katherine was released from prison in 1935 and had a measure of freedom. For years she went from camp to camp, trying without success to locate her husband. She was imprisoned a final time in 1949, after she tried to write to her children who lived in America. She was charged with being a counterrevolutionary and a spy.

The Pentecostal Evangel article recounted Katherine’s time in solitary confinement: “Her captors tried to hypnotize and brainwash her, but without success. She would close her eyes and silently pray. Her rat-infested cell had a concrete floor upon which she was forced to sleep without any bedding and she was clad only in a few worn-out garments. She was watched by the soldiers constantly through a peep hole.”

Soldiers waited for Katherine to have an emotional breakdown, but she instead felt the presence of God and kept remembering God’s promise: “I will never leave thee, nor forsake thee.” Despite a year of brutal torture, the article recounted, “her spirit remained free and she kept a song in her heart.”

The 1953 death of Soviet leader Joseph Stalin resulted in greater religious freedom, and Katherine was released from prison. But there was still great fear of reprisal, and she had to be very cautious. A son living in California discovered that Katherine was still alive and, through the intervention of the Eisenhower administration, Katherine was allowed to leave the Soviet Union in 1960 and come to the U.S. Upon her death in 1965, she still didn’t know whether her husband was alive or dead. After the fall of Soviet Union, documents were discovered that Ivan Voronaev had died in a slave labor camp in 1937.

The Voronaevs’ story wasn’t unique. Persecution separated consecrated believers from nominal Christians. Gustav H. Schmidt, Assemblies of God missionary to Slavic lands, wrote in 1934: “Anyone who is zealous for Jesus in Russia is marked for arrest and this makes Christian activity hazardous. Therefore we find no halfhearted Christians in Russia…Such who are not fully consecrated will not be able to stand the strain for any length of time but will step over into the enemy’s camp.”

Communist persecution not only failed to destroy Christianity; it helped to create a strong and vibrant Pentecostal movement numbering over one million adherents in the former Soviet Union.

Beginning in the late 1980s, when Mikhail Gorbachev began to allow persecuted religious minorities to emigrate, many put down roots in the United States. An estimated 500,000 Slavic Pentecostals from this recent wave of immigration now live in the United States, including children and grandchildren of immigrants who were born in the United States. While most are in congregations that are either independent or loosely affiliated with one of several Slavic Pentecostal unions, many are deciding to join the Assemblies of God.

In 2002, several Slavic Pentecostal churches in California joined the Assemblies of God and formed the Slavic Fellowship, which provided both a structure for Slavs to organize themselves within the Assemblies of God and also representation on the Fellowship’s General Presbytery. In September 2008, leaders of the Slavic Fellowship, in addition to other Slavic Pentecostals interested in affiliating with the Assemblies of God, came together in Renton, Washington, and organized the National Slavic District, which now has 69 affiliated churches.

The legacy of Ivan and Katherine Voronaev lives on in their spiritual descendants who now live in America. With deep faith burnished by decades of persecution, Slavic-American Pentecostals are poised to provide leadership in the broader church. And their leadership could not have come at a better time, as they have already proven their mettle in a culture that is hostile to biblical values.

Read the article by Ruth Demetrus, “Back from Siberia,” in the Nov. 27, 1960, issue of the Pentecostal Evangel.

Also featured in this issue:

• “Progress of the Gospel in South India” by Christine Carmichael

• “Fito Stands Firm” by Adele Flower Dalton

And many more!

Click here to read this issue now.

Pentecostal Evangel archived editions are courtesy of the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center.

Do you have Pentecostal historical materials that should be preserved? Please consider depositing these materials at the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center (FPHC). The FPHC, located in the Assemblies of God national offices, is the largest Pentecostal archive in the world. We would like to preserve and make your treasures accessible to those who write the history books.

Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center
1445 North Boonville Avenue
Springfield, Missouri 65802 USA
Phone: 417.862.1447 ext. 4400
Toll Free: 877.840.5200
Email: archives@ag.org
Website: www.iFPHC.org

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